Sugar Beets

first_imgGeorgia dairymen may soon have an alternative feed source for their cattle.Sugar beets could be a feed option for cattle, according to John Bernard, dairy cattle specialist with the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences. Cows like the beets, they are easily digestible and can be used as an energy source.“That’s what made it a target of interest here. Feeding whole sugar beets is something new that could be used on a large scale,” said Bernard, who is based on the UGA campus in Tifton.Bernard started researching alternative feed sources in 2012 in response to high corn prices of $7 to $8 a bushel. At those high costs, feeding corn to cattle is economically unsustainable over the long haul, Bernard says. Finding an alternative feed source for dairy cattle was imperative.“Having alternatives gives us additional risk management options for controlling costs, and frees up corn for other uses,” he said. Sugar beets are a viable option because they are digestable. Bernard said nearly 80 percent of the beet is moisture. The remaining material contains between 17 and 18 percent sugar and 8 percent protein.Further, growing sugar beets allows farmers to add diversity to their portfolio of commodities. Sugar beets require less fertilizer and loosen the soil as they grow.“Producers can do this locally and it works out well because beets grow in the wintertime, which works out well in the cropping scenario,” Bernard said. “It’s attracted quite a bit of interest.”While more research is needed, Bernard has high hopes for whole sugar beets becoming a new feed alternative for dairy cattle.“We hope to have more information so we can help producers know how to better store the beets once they process them, how to put them in rations to use them as an alternative feed and energy source, and how to help them control costs and give them more options,” he said.Bernard says Southern farmers are hesitant to make the feeding switch now, when corn prices are at an affordable price of $3.30.“It all depends on what will happens in the short term and long term with corn prices and corn availability,” Bernard said. “It is a good option for folks to look at and consider using.”Georgia’s dairy industry generates $338 million annually in farm gate value.(Jordan Hill is an intern on the UGA Tifton Campus.)last_img read more

Downtowns Share $300,000 In Transportation Grants

first_imgDowntowns Share $300,000 In Transportation GrantsBennington, Bristol, Burlington, Montpelier and Rutland Are WinnersMONTPELIER, Vt. (October 30 ,2008) – Five Vermont communities will be sharing more than $300,000 in state grants to pay for transportation infrastructure improvements in their downtowns, officials announced today. The Vermont Downtown Development Board also approved Village Center Designation for East Montpelier at its meeting Monday.”These grants will help strengthen these important centers of job creation and social activity,” said Kevin Dorn, Secretary of the Agency of Commerce and Community Development and chairman of the Downtown Development Board. “This is in keeping with Governor Jim Douglas’ vision of revitalizing Vermont’s downtowns.”The awards include:* Bennington – $5,157 for street signs, planters, and trees.* Bristol – – $74,772 for Prince Lane improvements to the back side of Main Street buildings to include undergrounding utilities, and a new sidewalk that will open up access to the rear of the buildings, clean up a neglected area, and improve pedestrian safety.* Burlington – $75,000 to contribute to a complete replacement of street lights at the Church Street Marketplace.* Montpelier – $74,961 for restoring an historic railroad turntable and creating a new public park, Turntable Park, on Stone Cutters Way.* Rutland – $75,000 for replacing streetlights on Strong’s Avenue and Washington Street, the fifth phase of the downtown streetlight project in Rutland.”These projects represent important investments in our communities, which not only help promote commerce but also help prevent sprawl and make our citizens less dependent on automobiles,” Dorn said.The transportation grant program was created specifically to support downtown capital transportation projects through the Vermont Downtown Program, which is part of the Agency of Commerce and Community Development.The Downtown Board also approved designation of East Montpelier’s village center, which runs along Route 2 roughly from the East Montpelier Home Center and just north of Mekkelsen’s RV, to the town offices and fire station at the junction of Routes 2 and 14.In addition to providing training, technical assistance, and administering grant and tax credit programs, the Downtown Program also oversees designation of downtowns and village centers.To date, 23 downtowns and 83 village centers have been designated and all older and historic buildings in these designated areas are eligible for state revitalization incentives.To become a Designated Downtown, communities must have both a downtown revitalization organization and demonstrate their commitment and capacity to support such a program, as well as meet several other requirements. Village Centers go through a similar, but abbreviated process.Both designated downtowns and village centers are also eligible to compete tax credits for historic and older building rehabilitation.More information can be found at the Agency of Commerce and Community Development’s Vermont Downtown Program website, www.historicvermont.org/programs/downtown.html(link is external)-30-last_img read more

Kelly Brush ride raises $275,000 for SCI research and prevention

first_imgThe 5th annual Kelly Brush Century Ride drew 675 riders and raised $275,000 for spinal cord injury prevention and research on Saturday.The ride, which began and ended at Middlebury College in Middlebury, Vermont, included 23 participants using hand cycles. The day was postcard perfect with clear blue skies and temperatures in the 70s. “We are absolutely thrilled to see such strong support for the foundation and our mission,” said Charlie Brush, Kelly Brush Foundation president. “Our thanks goes to each and every rider whose participation helps the Kelly Brush Foundation make a positive difference in the lives of those with SCI and raises the bar for ski racing safety.”The 100-mile ride raises money for improving ski racing safety, enhancing the quality of life for those with SCI through adaptive sports equipment grants, advancing scientific research on SCI and supporting the U.S. Adaptive Ski Team.The ride continues to grow each year. The number of participants grew by about 175 this year and fundraising increased by about 40 percent.For every $5,000 raised by a team or individual, the foundation donates adaptive sports equipment in the name of the team or individual who raised the money. In addition, funds raised support ski racing safety grants awarded to ski clubs and racing organizations across the country for safety netting to line race courses and safety gear for racers.The Kelly Brush Century Ride was started by the Middlebury College Ski Team as a way to raise money to buy an adaptive mono-ski for team member Kelly Brush, who was paralyzed as the result of a ski racing crash. Brush and her family later founded a non-profit, and the ride was opened to the public. On Saturday’s ride, participants rode distances of 28, 50 or 100 miles, with options for 65 and 85 mile loops.The Kelly Brush Century Ride is made possible thanks to the generosity of participants and sponsors including: VBT Bicycling and Walking Vacations, Sugarbush Resort, Shearer Audi, Audi of America, KeyBank, Saatchi & Saatchi and Champlain Investment Partners and others.About the foundation: The Kelly Brush Foundation is a non-profit organization dedicated to improving ski racing safety, enhancing the quality of life for those with spinal cord injury(SCI) through providing adaptive sports equipment, advancing scientific research on SCI and supporting the U.S. Adaptive Ski Team. Kelly Brush, together with her family, started the foundation in 2006 after she sustained a severe spinal cord injury while racing in NCAA Div. 1 competition as a member of the Middlebury College Ski Team in Vermont. The Kelly Brush Foundation affirms Kelly’s ongoing commitment to live life on her own terms and better the lives of others living with SCI. www.kellybrushfoundation.org(link is external)BURLINGTON, Vermont (Sept. 14, 2010)last_img read more