Downtowns Share $300,000 In Transportation Grants

first_imgDowntowns Share $300,000 In Transportation GrantsBennington, Bristol, Burlington, Montpelier and Rutland Are WinnersMONTPELIER, Vt. (October 30 ,2008) – Five Vermont communities will be sharing more than $300,000 in state grants to pay for transportation infrastructure improvements in their downtowns, officials announced today. The Vermont Downtown Development Board also approved Village Center Designation for East Montpelier at its meeting Monday.”These grants will help strengthen these important centers of job creation and social activity,” said Kevin Dorn, Secretary of the Agency of Commerce and Community Development and chairman of the Downtown Development Board. “This is in keeping with Governor Jim Douglas’ vision of revitalizing Vermont’s downtowns.”The awards include:* Bennington – $5,157 for street signs, planters, and trees.* Bristol – – $74,772 for Prince Lane improvements to the back side of Main Street buildings to include undergrounding utilities, and a new sidewalk that will open up access to the rear of the buildings, clean up a neglected area, and improve pedestrian safety.* Burlington – $75,000 to contribute to a complete replacement of street lights at the Church Street Marketplace.* Montpelier – $74,961 for restoring an historic railroad turntable and creating a new public park, Turntable Park, on Stone Cutters Way.* Rutland – $75,000 for replacing streetlights on Strong’s Avenue and Washington Street, the fifth phase of the downtown streetlight project in Rutland.”These projects represent important investments in our communities, which not only help promote commerce but also help prevent sprawl and make our citizens less dependent on automobiles,” Dorn said.The transportation grant program was created specifically to support downtown capital transportation projects through the Vermont Downtown Program, which is part of the Agency of Commerce and Community Development.The Downtown Board also approved designation of East Montpelier’s village center, which runs along Route 2 roughly from the East Montpelier Home Center and just north of Mekkelsen’s RV, to the town offices and fire station at the junction of Routes 2 and 14.In addition to providing training, technical assistance, and administering grant and tax credit programs, the Downtown Program also oversees designation of downtowns and village centers.To date, 23 downtowns and 83 village centers have been designated and all older and historic buildings in these designated areas are eligible for state revitalization incentives.To become a Designated Downtown, communities must have both a downtown revitalization organization and demonstrate their commitment and capacity to support such a program, as well as meet several other requirements. Village Centers go through a similar, but abbreviated process.Both designated downtowns and village centers are also eligible to compete tax credits for historic and older building rehabilitation.More information can be found at the Agency of Commerce and Community Development’s Vermont Downtown Program website, www.historicvermont.org/programs/downtown.html(link is external)-30-last_img read more

Athletic Code

first_imgEvery high school today must have an athletic code in writing or they will be open to all kinds of court proceedings.  The olden days of the principal handling each case as he sees it cannot stand up in court today.  Most schools will upgrade their codes on a regular basis to keep up with the changing scene of infractions.A lot of people believe that schools take too long to discipline a student, especially if drugs or alcohol are involved.  The good codes, like Batesville’s, allow the school to take their time to find out all the circumstances before they react.  This might mean that an athlete could participate for a short time before any action is taken.  You must do this in case that there was a mistake in the reporting of the incident.  No school wants to go through a lawsuit because they acted too soon.One gray area is the use of performance enhancing stimulants.  You notice that I did not say “drugs”, because many of the products on the market are “over the counter” and readily available.  That does not mean that they are not a violation of the athletic code.  The really gray area is the difference between a “vitamin” and a PED.  Some are one and the same, but creative labeling keeps them on the shelves at your local pharmacy.  This is another area that keeps athletic directors up at nights.last_img read more