Show Tunes Brought Andrew Rannells & Anne Hathaway Together

first_imgTony nominee Andrew Rannells stopped by The Today Show on September 23 to discuss his role in the new Nancy Meyers film The Intern. While there, he revealed that he didn’t have much internship experience of his own, aside from a gig during his freshman year at a talent agency, where he faxed headshots. Maybe he can get back into the biz with his Book of Mormon co-star and part-time agent Rory O’Malley? Unsurprisingly, Rannells and Oscar winner/musical theater enthusiast Anne Hathaway had a lot to bond over on set: “we nerded out a few times,” he said, and admitted that show tunes were indeed sung between takes. Check out the clip below, and catch The Intern in theaters beginning September 25. View Commentslast_img read more

ASEAN quickly turning to renewable energy hub

first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享The Asean Post: Technological innovations and favourable government policies are among the four trends expected to drive Southeast Asia’s transition to renewable energy in the coming years. A report published by global auditing firm KPMG titled ‘The Renewable Energy Transition’ noted that while there are still 70 million ASEAN citizens without access to reliable electricity, the potential for renewable energy is huge in those markets and governments are increasingly turning to solar and wind energy to address the issue.Consumers driving the green agenda forward and the entry of new funds into the ASEAN renewable energy market are two other trends identified in the report.Each of ASEAN’s 10 members have set targets for renewable energy, and technological innovations, such as better solar power efficiency and floating solar panels, mean that renewable energy is now more accessible than ever before.The establishment of RE100 in 2014 – a collaborative, global initiative uniting more than 100 influential businesses committed to 100 percent renewable energy – is a prime example of how consumers are helping to boost demand for renewable energy, especially since commerce and industry use up two thirds of the world’s electricity. Among the companies in the group include Google, Microsoft, Coca Cola and IKEA – all of which have a strong presence in ASEAN.The World Bank, Asian Development Bank (ADB) and Japan Bank for International Cooperation are leading the way in renewable energy investment in the region, which has helped to bring prices down. While prices have often been a key concern, falling costs and rising demand are now helping to push the industry forward.The Institute for Energy Economics and Financial Analysis (IEEFA) released a report in August 2018 which showed that the Philippines – where an estimated 20 million people lack constant electricity supply and 12 million have none at all –  can reduce its electricity costs to just 2.50 Philippine pesos (US$0.05) per kilowatt-hour (kWh) by installing rooftop solar. By comparison, diesel costs 15 Philippine pesos (US$0.28) per kWh and coal costs 3.8 Philippine pesos (US$0.07) per kWh.“Solar, wind, run-of-river hydro, geothermal, biogas, and storage are competitive, viable domestic options that can be combined to create a cheaper, more diverse and secure energy system,” said Sara Jane Ahmed, an IEEFA energy finance analyst and the author of the report.With its huge potential in renewable energy, ASEAN can be the new hub for renewable energy deployment, innovation and investments.More: ASEAN quickly turning to renewable energy hub ASEAN quickly turning to renewable energy hublast_img read more