Downtowns Share $300,000 In Transportation Grants

first_imgDowntowns Share $300,000 In Transportation GrantsBennington, Bristol, Burlington, Montpelier and Rutland Are WinnersMONTPELIER, Vt. (October 30 ,2008) – Five Vermont communities will be sharing more than $300,000 in state grants to pay for transportation infrastructure improvements in their downtowns, officials announced today. The Vermont Downtown Development Board also approved Village Center Designation for East Montpelier at its meeting Monday.”These grants will help strengthen these important centers of job creation and social activity,” said Kevin Dorn, Secretary of the Agency of Commerce and Community Development and chairman of the Downtown Development Board. “This is in keeping with Governor Jim Douglas’ vision of revitalizing Vermont’s downtowns.”The awards include:* Bennington – $5,157 for street signs, planters, and trees.* Bristol – – $74,772 for Prince Lane improvements to the back side of Main Street buildings to include undergrounding utilities, and a new sidewalk that will open up access to the rear of the buildings, clean up a neglected area, and improve pedestrian safety.* Burlington – $75,000 to contribute to a complete replacement of street lights at the Church Street Marketplace.* Montpelier – $74,961 for restoring an historic railroad turntable and creating a new public park, Turntable Park, on Stone Cutters Way.* Rutland – $75,000 for replacing streetlights on Strong’s Avenue and Washington Street, the fifth phase of the downtown streetlight project in Rutland.”These projects represent important investments in our communities, which not only help promote commerce but also help prevent sprawl and make our citizens less dependent on automobiles,” Dorn said.The transportation grant program was created specifically to support downtown capital transportation projects through the Vermont Downtown Program, which is part of the Agency of Commerce and Community Development.The Downtown Board also approved designation of East Montpelier’s village center, which runs along Route 2 roughly from the East Montpelier Home Center and just north of Mekkelsen’s RV, to the town offices and fire station at the junction of Routes 2 and 14.In addition to providing training, technical assistance, and administering grant and tax credit programs, the Downtown Program also oversees designation of downtowns and village centers.To date, 23 downtowns and 83 village centers have been designated and all older and historic buildings in these designated areas are eligible for state revitalization incentives.To become a Designated Downtown, communities must have both a downtown revitalization organization and demonstrate their commitment and capacity to support such a program, as well as meet several other requirements. Village Centers go through a similar, but abbreviated process.Both designated downtowns and village centers are also eligible to compete tax credits for historic and older building rehabilitation.More information can be found at the Agency of Commerce and Community Development’s Vermont Downtown Program website, www.historicvermont.org/programs/downtown.html(link is external)-30-last_img read more

Book too hot to handle for store

first_imgWairarapa Times-Age July 4 2013The novel voted as the best children’s book of the year contains explicit sex and drug-taking scenes which had one Wairarapa bookstore scrambling to pull it off their shelves.Ted Dawe’s Into the River claimed top prize in the annual New Zealand Post Children’s Book Awards.The author makes no apology for the provocative content, saying the story needs to be told, even at the risk of upsetting parents and booksellers.One scene describes, in extensive detail, two adolescents having fumbling sex in shallow water.Award organisers have sent “explicit content” stickers to all booksellers to warn potential buyers.The 2013 Kiwi Kids’ Good Book Guide lists the book’s target age as 13 years and over but Masterton Paper Plus says the book is only suitable for those over 15.Book manager Sue Reid said, while she usually monitors books when they arrive, the store had initially stocked it as it was a self-publication and had been “flying under the radar”.Mrs Reid said the book had now been removed from shelves.“While we are saying free speech, and people are free to write what they want, the conflict is that this is a children’s book winner. The book is actually aimed at 15-plus and it won in the category 13-plus.“The content is graphic and people who are pretty liberal have commented on how graphic it is.“Some of the staff have looked at it, and said ‘Oh my goodness’.”Mrs Reid said some Masterton school libraries had chosen not to stock the book, even before it won the award.Merchandise manager Catherine Raynes said the Paper Plus group left it up to individual stores to make the call.http://www.times-age.co.nz/news/book-too-hot-to-handle-for-store/1932452/last_img read more