Downtowns Share $300,000 In Transportation Grants

first_imgDowntowns Share $300,000 In Transportation GrantsBennington, Bristol, Burlington, Montpelier and Rutland Are WinnersMONTPELIER, Vt. (October 30 ,2008) – Five Vermont communities will be sharing more than $300,000 in state grants to pay for transportation infrastructure improvements in their downtowns, officials announced today. The Vermont Downtown Development Board also approved Village Center Designation for East Montpelier at its meeting Monday.”These grants will help strengthen these important centers of job creation and social activity,” said Kevin Dorn, Secretary of the Agency of Commerce and Community Development and chairman of the Downtown Development Board. “This is in keeping with Governor Jim Douglas’ vision of revitalizing Vermont’s downtowns.”The awards include:* Bennington – $5,157 for street signs, planters, and trees.* Bristol – – $74,772 for Prince Lane improvements to the back side of Main Street buildings to include undergrounding utilities, and a new sidewalk that will open up access to the rear of the buildings, clean up a neglected area, and improve pedestrian safety.* Burlington – $75,000 to contribute to a complete replacement of street lights at the Church Street Marketplace.* Montpelier – $74,961 for restoring an historic railroad turntable and creating a new public park, Turntable Park, on Stone Cutters Way.* Rutland – $75,000 for replacing streetlights on Strong’s Avenue and Washington Street, the fifth phase of the downtown streetlight project in Rutland.”These projects represent important investments in our communities, which not only help promote commerce but also help prevent sprawl and make our citizens less dependent on automobiles,” Dorn said.The transportation grant program was created specifically to support downtown capital transportation projects through the Vermont Downtown Program, which is part of the Agency of Commerce and Community Development.The Downtown Board also approved designation of East Montpelier’s village center, which runs along Route 2 roughly from the East Montpelier Home Center and just north of Mekkelsen’s RV, to the town offices and fire station at the junction of Routes 2 and 14.In addition to providing training, technical assistance, and administering grant and tax credit programs, the Downtown Program also oversees designation of downtowns and village centers.To date, 23 downtowns and 83 village centers have been designated and all older and historic buildings in these designated areas are eligible for state revitalization incentives.To become a Designated Downtown, communities must have both a downtown revitalization organization and demonstrate their commitment and capacity to support such a program, as well as meet several other requirements. Village Centers go through a similar, but abbreviated process.Both designated downtowns and village centers are also eligible to compete tax credits for historic and older building rehabilitation.More information can be found at the Agency of Commerce and Community Development’s Vermont Downtown Program website, www.historicvermont.org/programs/downtown.html(link is external)-30-last_img read more

Brazil’s Bolsonaro awaits new test to show if he is COVID-19 free

first_imgBrazilian President Jair Bolsonaro said on Tuesday that he took another coronavirus test and the results were expected Wednesday as he hopes for a negative result two weeks since falling ill.”I did the test now. Early tomorrow the results will come out,” Bolsonaro told supporters, speaking at a distance across the moat in front of his official residence.”If God wants to give a negative, things will return to normal.” Outside of the United States, Brazil is the worst-hit country in the coronavirus pandemic. The presidents of both countries have played down the extent of the crisis.Bolsonaro is one of nearly 2.2 million people in Brazil who have tested positive for the novel coronavirus, according to health ministry statistics released on Tuesday.More than 81,000 people have died from COVID-19 in Brazil.Bolsonaro tested positive for the novel coronavirus on July 7 but by the next day said he was already feeling well. A follow-up test last week also came back positive for the virus.Bolsonaro has previously said he has taken the anti-malarial drug hydroxycloroquine – unproven for treating coronavirus but touted by US President Donald Trump – and credits the medication as the reason for his mild symptoms.He said that he will travel to the northeastern state of Piaui on Friday, presuming he is well.With the toll of the pandemic rising rapidly, Brazil is also a major center for testing potential vaccines for the virus. On Tuesday, human trials of a second vaccine began and the government approved trials of a third.Topics :last_img read more

CNN: Is Azumah Nelson Africa’s greatest boxer?

first_imgIn his fighting days during the 1980s and 1990s, Ghanaian boxing legend Azumah Nelson’s thudding jabs and powerful overhands earned him the moniker “The Professor,” named for the lessons he’d teach opponents inside the ring.A former three-time world champion, Click Nelson is often described as the best boxer to come out of the African continent.His daring feats inside the four corners of the ring made him a national hero in the West African country, while in 2004 “The Professor” became the first African to be inducted into the International Boxing Hall of Fame.Watch Training the next champions.Today, Nelson’s nickname has taken on new meaning as the former champion now spends his time teaching the secrets of boxing to a new generation of athletes.“The Professor” has established the Azumah Nelson Foundation, a not-for-profit organization working to help Ghana’s deprived youth realize their potential through education and sport. “We opened the foundation to help the needy children,” says Nelson. “We look at you, see your talent and put you there — the school is there the most important [thing].”Read: Jordan’s female boxers fight hijab banBorn in 1958, Nelson made his professional debut in 1979. He quickly became a household name in Ghana and went on to win the British Commonwealth’s Featherweight title.But despite his early success, Nelson was still unknown outside his country — that changed, however, in June 1982 when he was given the chance to fight world Featherweight champion Salvador Sanchez at New York’s Madison Square Garden.Read also: From war child to U.S. Olympics star Although Nelson lost the fight in the 15th round, his impressive performance against a formidable opponent such as Sanchez established him as a top talent in the international boxing scene.He made history in 1984 when he beat Wilfredo Gomez to be crowned the World Boxing Council Featherweight champion. Four years later he cemented his reputation as boxing royalty when he won the world Super Featherweight/Junior Lightweight title.Read also: Why Klitschko sold Olympic medal for $1mNelson’s illustrious career went on for years until he decided to hang up his gloves with a record of 39 wins, 5 losses and 2 draws, with 28 knockout victories.Nowadays, Nelson is trying to preserve the legacy of boxing in Ghana, working with young talent to help create the country’s next crop of champions. He says the sport can help children escape poverty and hardship. “I’m a servant — God brought me to serve the people, especially the needy children,” he says. “I want to see everybody smile.”last_img read more