Kelly Brush ride raises $275,000 for SCI research and prevention

first_imgThe 5th annual Kelly Brush Century Ride drew 675 riders and raised $275,000 for spinal cord injury prevention and research on Saturday.The ride, which began and ended at Middlebury College in Middlebury, Vermont, included 23 participants using hand cycles. The day was postcard perfect with clear blue skies and temperatures in the 70s. “We are absolutely thrilled to see such strong support for the foundation and our mission,” said Charlie Brush, Kelly Brush Foundation president. “Our thanks goes to each and every rider whose participation helps the Kelly Brush Foundation make a positive difference in the lives of those with SCI and raises the bar for ski racing safety.”The 100-mile ride raises money for improving ski racing safety, enhancing the quality of life for those with SCI through adaptive sports equipment grants, advancing scientific research on SCI and supporting the U.S. Adaptive Ski Team.The ride continues to grow each year. The number of participants grew by about 175 this year and fundraising increased by about 40 percent.For every $5,000 raised by a team or individual, the foundation donates adaptive sports equipment in the name of the team or individual who raised the money. In addition, funds raised support ski racing safety grants awarded to ski clubs and racing organizations across the country for safety netting to line race courses and safety gear for racers.The Kelly Brush Century Ride was started by the Middlebury College Ski Team as a way to raise money to buy an adaptive mono-ski for team member Kelly Brush, who was paralyzed as the result of a ski racing crash. Brush and her family later founded a non-profit, and the ride was opened to the public. On Saturday’s ride, participants rode distances of 28, 50 or 100 miles, with options for 65 and 85 mile loops.The Kelly Brush Century Ride is made possible thanks to the generosity of participants and sponsors including: VBT Bicycling and Walking Vacations, Sugarbush Resort, Shearer Audi, Audi of America, KeyBank, Saatchi & Saatchi and Champlain Investment Partners and others.About the foundation: The Kelly Brush Foundation is a non-profit organization dedicated to improving ski racing safety, enhancing the quality of life for those with spinal cord injury(SCI) through providing adaptive sports equipment, advancing scientific research on SCI and supporting the U.S. Adaptive Ski Team. Kelly Brush, together with her family, started the foundation in 2006 after she sustained a severe spinal cord injury while racing in NCAA Div. 1 competition as a member of the Middlebury College Ski Team in Vermont. The Kelly Brush Foundation affirms Kelly’s ongoing commitment to live life on her own terms and better the lives of others living with SCI. www.kellybrushfoundation.org(link is external)BURLINGTON, Vermont (Sept. 14, 2010)last_img read more

Athletic Code

first_imgEvery high school today must have an athletic code in writing or they will be open to all kinds of court proceedings.  The olden days of the principal handling each case as he sees it cannot stand up in court today.  Most schools will upgrade their codes on a regular basis to keep up with the changing scene of infractions.A lot of people believe that schools take too long to discipline a student, especially if drugs or alcohol are involved.  The good codes, like Batesville’s, allow the school to take their time to find out all the circumstances before they react.  This might mean that an athlete could participate for a short time before any action is taken.  You must do this in case that there was a mistake in the reporting of the incident.  No school wants to go through a lawsuit because they acted too soon.One gray area is the use of performance enhancing stimulants.  You notice that I did not say “drugs”, because many of the products on the market are “over the counter” and readily available.  That does not mean that they are not a violation of the athletic code.  The really gray area is the difference between a “vitamin” and a PED.  Some are one and the same, but creative labeling keeps them on the shelves at your local pharmacy.  This is another area that keeps athletic directors up at nights.last_img read more