Ben Cohen blasts England appointment

first_img Top man: Nick Mallett would have been a better choice as England head coach says Ben CohenBEN COHEN has criticised the appointment of Stuart Lancaster as England head coach on a permanent basis.Cohen, who was part of England’s 2003 World Cup-winning squad, believes the RFU have made a mistake in giving Lancaster the role ahead of more experienced candidates like Nick Mallett, the former South Africa and Italy coach, and Wayne Smith, who was New Zealand’s assistant coach at last year’s World Cup.Winging in: Ben Cohen in action for England “I don’t think he is the right man,” Cohen told talkSPORT. “I think he is a man to keep around the squad for the future most definitely. Then have someone around that who’s maybe got experience in World Cups. NOT FOR FEATURED “Let’s be frank, you look at the Six Nations as a honeymoon period and there are testing times to come ahead. Yes, he will learn from every game and every situation he has, and he has four years to build up to the World Cup, but you want someone who’s got experience of managing through that. That’s how I see it. Hopefully I am wrong and I will have egg on my face in 18 months’ time.”England won four of their five games in the recent Six Nations under Lancaster to finish second in the table, but Cohen added: “I’m still wary if he can manage the transition and bring on individuals. I haven’t seen the England side come on in their structure and systems that they play on the pitch.” LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS “Nick Mallet has got credentials coming out of his ears, he has got a great CV. And Wayne Smith. They are people who know how to react in tough times.last_img read more

European Rugby: Weekend’s talking points

first_imgThe inaugural European Rugby Champions Cup kicks off this weekend. RW takes a look at some of the key talking points that could shape the opening round Eye on the prize: This is what the 20 European Champions Cup teams are playing for Their problem in recent years has been failing to secure a home berth in the quarter-finals, having gone out at that stage in three of the last four tournaments. Leicester are an imposing prospect at Welford Road, but they do not often offer the same threat on the road – a win at home to Ulster tomorrow night is pivotal to their hopes in the pool stages.The Tigers are not the only team whose European stock has plummeted in recent months. Four-time champions Toulouse suffered five losses on the bounce for the first time since 1962 earlier this campaign, including defeat to newly-promoted La Rochelle. They may be the most decorated side in Heineken Cup history, but if their early-season displays continue, they could be bowing out and sending Guy Noves into retirement.Tigers tamed: Leicester’s position as a European heavyweight is coming under threatCan Sexton dominate the Saints again?In the 2011 Heineken Cup final, Jonny Sexton produced a virtuoso attacking display to help Leinster win a stunning European crown, terrorising the Northampton defence with probing runs that ended in two tries. Stephen Myler, his opposing number on the day was powerless to stop the turnaround.Tomorrow evening, Sexton and Myler will lock horns once again, but in vastly different circumstances.Sexton is now plying his trade on the continent with Top 14 outfit Racing Metro, who have endured a mixed start to the Top 14 season – five wins and four defeats from nine games. The success he enjoyed as part of Leinster’s European dynasty has been exchanged for a shot at French glory and no little riches, but there is unrest in the capital, with their inconsistent displays soured further by the airing of dirty laundry from head coach Laurent Labit over his Welsh stars.Myler, on the other hand, has matured in the East Midlands, becoming a figurehead in Saints rise to the summit of English rugby. His ability to control a game and then influence it with a try-making pass have seen him secure the fly-half berth outright at Franklins Gardens, while some have touted him as a possible viable option in England’s number 10 jersey for the upcoming Autumn Internationals.It will be an intriguing sub-plot to see who can edge the battle of the fly-halves tomorrow.Flashback: Sexton was key to Leinster’s 2011 Heineken Cup final victory over Northampton LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALScenter_img TAGS: Glasgow WarriorsHighlightSaracens Sarries need that final stepThe 46-6 demolition job that Saracens did on Clermont Auvergne in last April’s Heineken Cup semi-final felt like a seismic shifting of Europe’s tectonic plates. It was a day when Sarries intensity – symbolised by Jacques Burger’s 28 tackles – steamrolled their illustrious French opponents into the Twickenham turf.A month later however, and the rout was a distant memory, with the North London club going on to lose two showpiece finals in the space of a mightily sobering week.A response is expected this time out and if Saracens are to be bandied about in the same sentence as Toulon or Leinster, they need a European star to place above the crests on their shirts.The first step on their road to redemption is a replay of that semi-final against a Clermont side. The continental giants may well be ‘the best team never to win a Heineken Cup’ , but last year’s humbling at Sarries’ hands hinted at their fallibility, and they go into tomorrow’s clash off the back of a 51-21 humbling at Bordeaux – meaning they are vulnerable as never before.Semi-success: Chris Ashton and Brad Barritt celebrate in last year’s thrashing of ClermontCan dark horses stay the course?Much of the talk ahead of the European curtain being raised has centred on how the big dawgs are expected to deliver, a fact that has kept the spotlight away from Pool Four – a group which may yet unearth one of the competition’s dark horses.Glasgow and Bath have both started their domestic campaigns in spritely fashion. Gregor Townsend’s Warriors sit second after five wins from their opening six games, including a 22-20 downing of Pro12 champions Leinster, with the eye-catching displays of Fijian scrum-half Niko Matawalu a particular highlight.Meanwhile, Bath have provided some notable performances of their own since the start of September. A record-breaking 45-0 thrashing of Leicester was quickly followed by the equally important scalp of Saracens, as Mike Ford’s men have provided an added intensity against the league’s top teams that has helped them to build on the promise of last season.The form of both sides bodes well for their clash at Scotstoun Stadium tomorrow. Toulouse’s well-publicised malaise – save for last weekend’s impressive victory over Toulon – coupled with Montpellier’s erratic displays in Europe, means that Pool Two’s British contingent will be seeing qualification from this group as more than achievable. Historically, neither side has enjoyed much success in Europe’s elite competition in recent years – Bath’s 1998 success is almost tainted in sepia, while Glasgow perpetually have struggled in the Heineken Cup. Advancing to the quarter-final stage should be the minimum target for these two teams.Indeed, RW’s Russ Petty used a range of statistics to predict that the Warriors may well be worth an outside bet to lift the new trophy in May.Warrior’s chance: Matawalu will be hoping to help Glasgow to finally impress in EuropeFallen giants keen to stay in touchWe’re only halfway through October, but already you could line the Stade Mayol with the amount of newspaper pieces written on Leicester’s early-season travails. Richard Cockerill’s side find themselves in an unfamiliar eighth position in the Premiership coming into the European double-header, a statistic which puts their quest to qualify from a difficult Pool Three – Toulon, Scarlets and Ulster – into perspective.For the Tigers, it’s been 12 long years since they lifted the second of their European titles, and in truth, they’ve looked unlikely to add to that tally since a 19-16 defeat to Leinster in the 2009 final.last_img read more

The Rugby World Big Quiz of the Year

first_imgLATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS IF YOU missed this quiz in the January edition of Rugby World, why not test your knowledge of the game now. It’s out of 100, with a point for each correct answer unless otherwise stated. So get those brain cells going and see how many you can get right!A. CLASS OF 20141. Which five players were nominated for World Rugby’s Player of the Year award? (5)2. Who dropped two goals in the 2014 RBS 6 Nations?3. Name the two try-scorers in England Women’s World Cup final win over Canada. (2)4. Jonny and Richie Gray (below) were the first brothers to both score tries in a Test for Scotland since who? (2)5. What was the score when Ireland beat New Zealand at the Women’s World Cup? (2)6. Which home nations player was listed as ‘unattached’ for the autumn Internationals?7. Who was the top point-scorer in the 2014 Rugby Championship?8. Name the Wallabies’ two coaches in 2014. (2)9. Why did Aaron Cruden miss a flight to Argentina in September?10. Who did Jérôme Garcès send off in the 2014 Six Nations after reviewing the big screen?11. Who was the only person nominated for both a World Rugby (IRB) Player and Try of the Year Award in 2014? Total: 19ptsB. PICK & MIX1. Why was Dave Attwood’s selection for the New Zealand game in November in doubt?2. Who became a world champion and had a No 1 hit single in 2014?3. What’s the IRB’s new name?4. What links Stuart Lancaster and Blackadder’s Rowan Atkinson?5. What was the name of Thom Evans’s partner on Strictly Come Dancing?6. Which two Wales players got married on the same day in July 2014? (2)7. Which Hollywood star owns Sam Burgess’s old club, South Sydney Rabbitohs?8. Which Welshman had a Twitter spat with One Direction’s Niall Horan?9. Which active serviceman made his England debut in November?10. Which current All Black got rejected on Tinder for being too short? Total: 11ptsC. BODY PARTSCan you identify the eight players from these close-ups? Two points for each correct answer. Total: 16ptsD. RWC RECAP1. Who scored the first try at both the 1987 and 1991 Rugby World Cups?2. Which two countries has ex-All Black John Kirwan coached at a RWC? (2)3. Who was the top point-scorer at RWC 1991?4. Marc Ellis holds the record for the most tries in a RWC game. How many did he score?5. What is the only ground to have staged two RWC finals?6. Who was the only man to play every minute of England’s 2007 World Cup campaign?7. What’s the biggest winning margin in a RWC game and which teams played in it? (3)8. Name the four players to play at fly-half for New Zealand at RWC 2011. (4)Total: 14pts Want to know how you’ve done? For all the answers, click here.For the latest Rugby World subscription offers, click here. And to find out how to download the digital edition, click here. E. BADGER’S BLANKSFill in the missing word in these classic Nick Cummins quotes. Three points for each.1. “My old man woke me up in the morning. He was going off like a bag of —-.”2. “We were all sizzle and no —-, now we’re off like a bride’s nightie.”3. “The boys were on it like —- at a tip.”4. “You’re as tough as —- lips.”5. “We were going off like a raw —-.”Total: 15ptsF. CLUB TOGETHER1. Who scored the winning try for Northampton in the Aviva Premiership final?2. What club scored the most tries in last season’s Pro12 (regular season)?3. What club ended Clermont Auvergne’s unbeaten home run?4. Which city have Wasps moved to?5. Why did Bryan Habana have to apologise after the last Heineken Cup final?6. What was the aggregate score of the 2014 Greene King IPA Championship final? (2)7. Which Saracen captained England U20 to victory in the Junior World Championship final?8. Who kicked the last-minute penalty in Waratahs’ Super Rugby final win over Crusaders?9. What clubs do the following play for: a) Gareth Anscombe b) Johnnie Beattie c) Ben Te’o d) John Afoa (4)Total: 13ptsG. GUESS WHOName the players (and coach) pictured below. Two points per correct answer. Total: 12pts Here’s your chance to test your rugby knowledgelast_img read more

Autumn Internationals Scotland v South Africa preview

first_imgLATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS “South Africa have always had a smart kicking game with an excellent chase but what we’ve seen over the past few months is an ambition to move the ball from counter attack and a push to get their forwards passing the ball more.“Our defence will have to be strong to nullify this ambitious attacking game plan.”Related: Rassie Erasmus coaches ‘Owen Farrell tackle’South Africa’s Rassie Erasmus said: “We know we are going to face well-coached, fit, energetic team that is good in their systems. They are maybe not the biggest team in the world but what they lack in size they make up for with intensity, speed and a great system.“We know their record at home, smashing teams. They put 50 points on Australia, they beat England proper, they beat Argentina well on the road. We know what are in for. It is going to be a tough game.”Any interesting statistics?Scotland have only scored one try against South Africa in their previous three meetings.Scotland have only lost at home once in the last ten matches there – losing by five points to New Zealand in 2017.Rassie Erasmus has a 50% win ratio with South Africa.The last time these two met at Murrayfield, Scotland did not score a single point.The last Scotland player to score a try against South Africa was Tommy Seymour, who scored a hat-trick last weekend.Gregor Townsend beat South Africa three times as a player – twice on the 1997 Lions tour, and once with Scotland in 2002.Familiar subject: Romain Poite refereed South Africa in JuneWhat time does it kick off and is it on TV?Scotland v South Africa, Saturday 17 November, MurrayfieldThe match in Edinburgh kicks off at 5.20pm and is live on BBC2 as well as BBC Radio Scotland.French referee Romain Poite will be in charge of proceedings, with Ben O’Keeffe of New Zealand and Frank Murphy of Ireland as his assistants. Kiwi Ben Skeen is the TMO.What are the line-ups?Scotland: Stuart Hogg; Tommy Seymour, Huw Jones, Pete Horne, Sean Maitland; Finn Russell, Greig Laidlaw (captain); Gordon Reid, Stuart McInally, Willem Nel, Ben Toolis, Jonny Gray, Sam Skinner, Hamish Watson, Ryan Wilson.Replacements: Fraser Brown, Allan Dell, Simon Berghan, Josh Strauss, Jamie Ritchie, Ali Price, Adam Hastings, Chris Harris.South Africa:Willie le Roux; Sbu Nkosi, Jesse Kriel, Damian de Allende, Aphiwe Dyantyi; Handré Pollard, Embrose Papier; Steven Kitshoff, Malcolm Marx, Frans Malherbe, RG Snyman, Franco Mostert, Siya Kolisi (captain), Pieter-Steph du Toit, Duane Vermeulen. Autumn Internationals Scotland v South Africa previewThere has been a lot of mutual respect flying between the Scots and Boks this week as South Africa head to Murrayfield for the first time since 2013 – the pair last met in Newcastle in 2015.Both teams have had moments to savour and reason to cringe so far this November. Scotland stumbled once again in Cardiff against Wales, but registered a big win against Fiji at home. South Africa, meanwhile have lost by a squeak against England and then fallen from the jaws of defeat against France to take a don’t-blink-or-you’ll-miss-it victory.With both teams right beside each other in the World Rugby Rankings (Scotland are sixth with the Springboks in fifth), and with Scotland winning nine of their last ten Tests at home, South Africa have put out as robust a squad as they can muster. Will Gregor Townsend’s charges play, as Boks boss Rassie Erasmus describes, with a Super Rugby-style?Although, amazingly, there is no official trophy or trinket to hand to the winner of this fixture, it feels like a November-defining weekend for both sides.Big win: Scotland celebrating their victory over Fiji last weekWhat’s the big team news?Townsend has changed six from the team that defeated Fiji. Centre Huw Jones returns to the fray to partner auxiliary playmaker Pete Horne. In the pack, Gordon Reid comes in at loosehead, vice-captain and hooker Stuart McInally is reinstated while work-horses Jonny Gray, Ben Toolis and Hamish Watson slide into the back five of the scrum.There is a sense of the familiar with Scotland’s half-backs as France-based pair Finn Russell and Greig Laidlaw settle in as half-backs. But Adam Hastings is waiting in the wings should the adventurous Glasgow Warriors fly-half be called upon to add a running threat.South Africa have made just two changes with lock RG Snyman in for the imposing Eben Etzebeth and scrum-half Embrose Papier handed a start with Faf de Klerk returning to Sale Sharks.With Snyman called in and Warren Whiteley struggling with a calf complaint, Pieter-Steph du Toit shifts from lock to back row. This in turn shunts Duane Vermuelen back to No 8.Man of the hour: hooker Bongi Mbonambi scored late to down France last weekWhat have the coaches said?Gregor Townsend said: “Their traditional strength has always been their physicality and this remains a key point of difference for them. We expect them to be confrontational and powerful in their ball carrying, their defence and also at set-piece time. It will be a great challenge for our forward pack in particular. All you need to know about Scotland’s upcoming showdown with the Springboks this weekend.center_img Last time they met: Tommy Seymour scored against the Boks at RWC2015 Replacements:Bongi Mbonambi, Thomas du Toit, Vincent Koch, Lood de Jager, Francois Louw, Ivan van Zyl, Elton Jantjies, Cheslin Kolbe.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.last_img read more

Is England’s dominance good for the Women’s Six Nations?

first_imgAnother Grand Slam is on the cards for the Red Roses after they brushed aside Wales LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS The April issue of Rugby World magazine – focusing on a new generation of Six Nations stars – is out now.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter. Is England’s dominance good for the Women’s Six Nations?England’s march to back-to-back Women’s Six Nations Grand Slams continued with a 66-7 victory against Wales at Twickenham Stoop on Saturday.Quite when Sarah Hunter & Co will be able to complete the clean sweep and lift the trophy is undetermined given that their final match against Italy – along with several others in the women’s championship – has been postponed due to the cornonavirus outbreak.Yet the inevitable nature of this title triumph raises serious questions about the Women’s Six Nations.England have scored 165 points in their four victories to date and conceded only 20. In two matches – against Scotland and Ireland – they kept their opponents scoreless while France and Wales crossed for only one try apiece, the Welsh one a penalty award after England failed to clear their lines.Those figures underline exactly how dominant the Red Roses have been in this championship. Once they had seen off France in their opening game, the engravers could have got to work on the trophy. And the fact the Women’s Six Nations is such a foregone conclusion undermines the entire championship.Three of a kind: Poppy Cleall scored a hat-trick against Wales (Getty Images)The record crowd at the Stoop will have enjoyed seeing England run in ten tries – including a hat-trick for lock Poppy Cleall – but how can supporter engagement be maintained when so many results are almost preordained?Sport is meant to be competitive, there needs to be an element of the unknown in results. England’s players and coaches can talk about how tough matches are, how scorelines don’t reflect the contests, but ultimately they are competing against themselves, trying to improve on their last performance.Yes, England are professional, but the onus has to be on the other nations – or more specifically the unions – to raise their own standards. Otherwise the integrity of the tournament will continue to be challenged.The one-sided nature of matches is perfectly illustrated by the statistics from the win over Wales. The visitors spent only 36 seconds in the England 22, made zero line breaks to England’s 12 and put in 217 tackles compared to just 84 from the hosts.center_img The physicality of the English pack was the standout feature of the Wales fixture. The fact eight of their ten tries came from the forwards, six from the tight five, illustrates the power game England played, so much so that you barely saw the backs making breaks. World Player of the Year Emily Scarratt wasn’t required to bust the line until the closing minutes.The skill level of those forwards has undoubtedly been enhanced by the extra time they have to work on those areas as professionals, but more significantly they are better conditioned – stronger, fitter, faster.Ask England coach Simon Middleton about the state of the Six Nations and he focuses on the advantage his team have physically.“It is competitive in many ways,” he insists. “Wales were very competitive and the score didn’t reflect their performance.“It’s how you address the physical balance. With the greatest respect, we can physically dominate sides. That’s the bit the other nations need to address – how to afford the time and resources to develop players physically.Attacking threat: It takes several defenders to stop Shaunagh Brown (Getty Images)“That’s the biggest difference being full-time has made to us: physical preparation. We have the time to train at a really high level, the highest level we can. We’ve got great athletes in the squad, incredibly athletic players.”Other unions do not yet seem willing – or indeed able – to invest in their women’s teams to the same level as England. The tournament organisers have failed to monetise the championship with standalone sponsors or a TV deal, with countries negotiating their own broadcasting agreements (although there are plans for that to change going forward).Until these things happen, or unions at least increase their investment in their women’s 15s programmes, there will continue to be a disparity in standards in these fixtures. That’s what happens when it’s amateurs versus professionals – and it does little to help the credibility of the tournament. Power surge: Hannah Botterman makes a burst upfield (Getty Images) last_img read more

2021 Rugby World Cup Qualifying Process

first_imgHow the best women’s teams from across the globe can book their place at the tournament in New Zealand Open space: Ireland’s Edel McMahon breaks the Scotland defence (Getty Images) 2021 Rugby World Cup Qualifying ProcessNine countries have already qualified for the 2021 Rugby World Cup, but ten teams are still competing for the remaining three places.The qualification process to decide the final places for New Zealand 2021 has been thrown up in the air by the pandemic and is one of the factors in the women’s tournament being postponed until 2022.New Zealand, England, France, USA, Canada, Australia and Wales qualified after finishing in the top seven at RWC 2017. South Africa and Fiji booked their places by winning the Rugby Africa Cup and Oceania Rugby Championship respectively.Other qualifying matches were all due to take place before the end of 2020, but that was not possible due to the postponement of competitions.The RWC 2021 European qualifiers, which will feature Ireland, Italy, Scotland and the winner of the Rugby Europe Women’s Championship, have now been postponed twice with no news yet on when they will be held. The winner of that tournament qualifies automatically for the World Cup, with the runner-up heading to the repêchage. However, with the window in which to fit qualifiers getting ever smaller, particularly when you consider that some 15s players will also be involved in sevens campaigns ahead of the Olympics, it is little surprise that the tournament has been postponed.Related: Olympic preparations for sevens teams up in the airAnother outstanding fixture before the repêchage is the play-off between Colombia and Kenya. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALScenter_img One match that has taken place is the play-off between Samoa and Tonga to determine who would take part in the four-team repêchage tournament. Samoa were comfortable 40-0 winners in that fixture at Trusts Arena in New Zealand.The postponement of RWC 2021 now gives organisers more time to arrange the remaining qualifiers. Can’t get to the shops? You can download the digital edition of Rugby World straight to your tablet or subscribe to the print edition to get the magazine delivered to your door.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter. Spain have been able to book their place in that qualifying tournament after beating Russia 56-7 and the Netherlands 87-0 in February to win the Rugby Europe Women’s Championship.With regards the qualifiers, a Rugby Europe statement said: “World Rugby and Rugby Europe continue to consult with unions and Six Nations Rugby Limited regarding a window that provides a fair opportunity to deliver the Europe qualifier, who will qualify directly for Rugby World Cup 2021 in New Zealand. The runner-up will progress to the final qualification tournament to be held in 2021.”There is also uncertainty in other parts of the world over when qualifiers will be played. The Asia Rugby Championship, which features Hong Kong, Japan and Kazakhstan, was due to take place in March, was postponed until May and then rescheduled for March 2021.However, that was called off as well, with a World Rugby statement reading: “In light of ongoing Covid-19 travel and quarantine restrictions, Asia Rugby, in full consultation with the Hong Kong Rugby Union and participating unions, have taken the decision not to host the Asia Rugby Women’s Championship on 5, 9 and 13 March in Hong Kong as originally planned.“Asia Rugby, participating unions and World Rugby continue to work closely to determine alternative hosting solutions.”last_img read more

Unnatural affections

first_img Submit an Event Listing Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Collierville, TN This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Lucy Germany says: Rector Bath, NC April 21, 2012 at 8:04 am Thanks Scott and everyone else for the insightful comments and affirmations. To clarify, I did not mean to suggest that the wealthy are the only ones that lack concern for the environment, but are the main reason why it is not more integrated into worship and liturgy. I had not thought about what you said Scott–that they’re willing to stepon less wealthy toes. In the name of avoiding conflict, I think this does happen. Some clergy have told me that after the dealing with the conflicts over gay ordination and marriage, they just don’t want to have more. As I mention in the commentary, I have found ways to engage people on nature and spirituality that build bridges rather than stir conflict, but one must be spiritually formed on the issue. Happy Earth Day! Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME April 20, 2012 at 1:44 pm This is such an important discussion on so many levels.The disregard we show for the earth is disregard for our children.We are missing a precious opportunity to engage with the best in our God-given creativity to find ways to work in harmony with the sanctity of the earth.A whole generation of bright, creative, think-outside-the-box, young people could find a deeply meaningful place of leadership here if we would only invite and encourage them.Thank you for your clear voice. Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Washington, DC Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Unnatural affections Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Pittsburgh, PA Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET By Phyllis StruppPosted Apr 19, 2012 Rector Shreveport, LA Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Hopkinsville, KY TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Dr. Lo Sprague says: Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Youth Minister Lorton, VA New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books center_img Comments are closed. Rector Tampa, FL Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Knoxville, TN Curate Diocese of Nebraska In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Associate Rector Columbus, GA The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Director of Music Morristown, NJ Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Submit a Job Listing Featured Events Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Featured Jobs & Calls Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH [Episcopal News Service] Six years ago, our district’s state representative granted my request for a meeting. Waiting in his office, I noticed that the walls were covered with pictures of smiling people receiving awards, celebrating birthdays, and holding babies. As he settled in behind his desk with a cup of coffee, he asked what was on my mind. On behalf of the Diocese of Arizona’s Nature and Spirituality Program, I urged him to give careful consideration to ecological consequences when deciding how to vote on several pending bills. Leaning forward, he looked intently at me and said, “I hate environmentalists. I hate them because they like trees more than people.”There is a shred of truth to his harsh words. I have met some environmentalists who have an unnatural affection for nature, embracing it as an escape from destructive human relationships. But far more common is my representative’s unnatural affection for people above everything else.This human-centric perspective is especially common in the Episcopal Church, underlying the anemic response to the bishops’ pastoral teaching on the environment issued in September 2011. This theologically profound work indicates the time has come for reconciling the broken relationship between the church and creation.Based on my experience with green ministry, four widespread attitudes in the church are hindering the Holy Spirit’s work in this area. First and foremost is the view that people come first and nature comes second—as if they are separate entities. Human needs for air, food, water, clothing, shelter, and other necessities are met by resources drawn from the natural world. Even manmade products depend on natural resources. Creation can live without people, but people can’t live without creation. If you don’t care about creation, you don’t really care about people.Secondly, is the attitude that environmentalism is a political issue that should not come up in the church. This concern has kept many clergy from preaching about creation, less they step on the political toes of well-heeled parishioners during tough economic times. Creation as a spiritual issue can be addressed in ways that build bridges between liberals and conservatives. We were able to do this among the members of the Nature and Spirituality Program. However, this bridge building requires spiritual formation on creation that the church is not currently providing to clergy and lay leaders.Thirdly, is the belief that money matters more than natural resources or just about anything else. Perhaps this is an unconscious defense to avoid the unpleasant truth that many Episcopalians’ wallets and the Episcopal Church’s coffers are filled with dirty money that was earned by exploiting the creation.Fourthly, is the view that creation has nothing to do with the gospel and Christ. Perhaps this attitude persists because there is so little preaching and liturgy that includes Creation. However, the Bible confirms that God has a glorious plan for all of creation, not just people. The first two chapters of Genesis reveal that a human being is defined by his or her relationships with God, creation, others and self. The New Testament builds on this spiritual foundation. Jesus refers to his second coming as “the renewal of all things” (Matthew 19:28) and commands, “Go into all the world and preach the gospel to all creation” (Mark 16:15).We are joined at the hip with creation, physically and spiritually.Earth Day, April 22, provides a convenient opportunity to get behind the Holy Spirit’s green work in the church. Is there someone you know who has a passion for environmental advocacy or animal welfare? Take the time to learn more about their work, and how they came to be concerned about the issue. Affirm their willingness to be a voice crying out in the wilderness of an indifferent church and a hostile society. Ask your clergy to preach and teach more about how God is at work in our relationship with creation. Ask the prayer group to pray for the healing of creation and all people and species who have been harmed by ecological distress. Resolve to be just as careful with natural resources as you are with money. Give thanks to God for this good earth—and delight in a natural affection for all that God has made in nature and humanity.— Phyllis Strupp is the author of the award-winning book “The Richest of Fare: Seeking Spiritual Security in the Sonoran Desert” and Church Publishing’s companion curriculum “Faith and Nature: The Divine Adventure of Life on Earth.” Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR April 20, 2012 at 5:38 pm The core of the problem is the way we treat it as an elephant or some other large unwieldy creature on our property…it is soo identified with money, with power, with politics. with complex structures and organization that we forget where it all begins — where you live, where you walk, where you breathe. The interest in nature precedes the love of nature — when you acquire some understanding of it, you can hardly help but love the nature around you and to appreciate its importance as a setting for human activity. True — there are mishaps — storms and drought, but often the passing of these can not only increase your admiration for human flexibility and recovery of human structure but also admiration for the tenacity of nature and for the confidence in its mix of gift and grief — one of which makes us happy and the other which makes us stronger. Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Albany, NY Comments (3) Phyllis Strupp says: Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Press Release Service Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Submit a Press Release Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Belleville, ILlast_img read more

Convention elects Episcopalians to churchwide boards

first_img Rector Belleville, IL TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Featured Events [Episcopal News Service] When the 77th General Convention met July 5-12 in Indianapolis, the bishops and deputies elected people to a number of churchwide boards, and confirmed appointments to others.The convention elected two bishops, seven lay and two clergy members to the church’s Executive Council, which carries out the programs and policies adopted by the General Convention, according to Canon I.4 (1)(a). The council is composed of 38 members, 20 of whom (four bishops, four priests or deacons and 12 lay people) are elected by General Convention and 18 (one clergy and one lay) by provincial synods for six-year terms, plus the presiding bishop and the president of the House of Deputies.Information about the newly elected members of council is here.As happens at every General Convention, the gathering elected the members of the Joint Standing Committee for the Election of the Presiding Bishop. The 27 people elected will be joined by two persons, aged 16-21, who will be appointed by the Rev. Gay Jennings, president of the House of Deputies, according to the election process outlined in Canon I.2.1.The 2013-2015 iteration of the committee will be in charge of nominating at least three bishops to succeed Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori, 58, whose nine-year term ends Oct. 31, 2015. The 27th presiding bishop will be elected at the 78th General Convention to be held in July 2015 in Salt Lake City.In the past, the nominees have been announced prior to the start of the convention during which the election will take place. The names are formally placed into nomination at convention during a joint session of the House of Bishops and the House of Deputies. Nominations from the floor are allowed during that session. There is no limit to the number of terms a presiding bishop may serve. The only requirement is that the presiding bishop must tender his or her resignation to the General Convention that occurs closest to his or her 72nd birthday. All Episcopal Church clergy are required to resign their position when they reach that age.On the day following the joint session, the bishops traditionally meet apart from the convention to elect the next presiding bishop. The bishops then report to the House of Deputies the results of the election, including with the votes cast for each nominee on each ballot. The deputies must then vote to confirm or not confirm the bishops’ choice.The people elected by convention (a bishop, cleric and lay person from each province) to serve on the election committee are:Massachusetts Bishop Thomas Shaw, the Rev. Canon Mally Ewing Lloyd and Dante A. Tavolaro (Province I),Western New York Bishop R. William Franklin, the Rev. Canon Sandye A. Wilson and Diane B. Pollard (Province II),Central Pennsylvania Bishop Nathan Baxter, the Rev. Ruth Lawson Kirk and Nina Vest Salmon (Province III),Mississippi Bishop Duncan Gray, the Rev. Canon Amy Real Coultas and Josephine H. Hicks (Province IV),Michigan Bishop Wendell Gibbs, the Very Rev. Ellis Clifton and William Fleener, Jr. (Province V),Wyoming Bishop John S. Smylie, the Rev. Devon Anderson and Sally A. Johnson (Province VI),Oklahoma Bishop Edward Konieczny, the Rev. Lowell Grisham and Diane P. Butler (Province VII),Los Angeles Bishop Suffragan Mary Glasspool, the Rev. David Hilton Jackson and Pauline (Polly) Getz (Province VIII) andHonduras Bishop Lloyd Allen, the Rev. Jose Francisco Salazar and Luis Eduardo Moreno (Province IX).Other elections during General Convention included:Church Pension Fund board of trusteesRosalie Simmonds Ballentine (Virgin Islands),Barbara B. Creed (incumbent, California),Vincent C. Currie, Jr. (incumbent, Central Gulf Coast),Gordon Fowler (Pennsylvania),Delbert C. Glover (Western Massachusetts),The Rt. Rev. Diane M. Jardine Bruce (Los Angeles),Mr. Ryan K. Kusumoto (Hawaii),Canon Kathryn Weathersby McCormick (Mississippi),Diane B. Pollard (incumbent, New York),The Very Rev. George L. W. Werner (incumbent, Pittsburgh),Sleiman (Solomon) Owayda (Massachsetts) andCecil Wray (incumbent, New York)Disciplinary Board for Bishops(called for in Canon 17 of the church’s rules for disciplining clergy and bishops known as Title IV)The Rev. Canon Angela F. Shepherd (Maryland),The Rev. Peggy E. Tuttle (Hawaii),A. Joseph Alarid (Rio Grande),William J. Fleener, Jr. (Western Michigan),Connecticut Bishop Ian T. Douglas,Texas Bishop Suffragan Dena Harrison,Southern Virginia Bishop Herman Hollerith,Northwest Texas Bishop J. Scott Mayer andRochester Bishop Prince Singh.General Board of Examining ChaplainsFrederick W. Gerbracht, Jr. (Long Island),Sandra D. Michael (incumbent, Central New York),Janet Powers Roth (Oregon),the Rev. Stephen C. Holmgren (incumbent, Western Michigan),the Rev. Danielle Tumminio (Connecticut),the Rev. Peter Vanderveen (Pennsylvania),Frank G. Kirkpatrick (Trinity College, Hartford, Conn.),The Rev. Dr. Patrick Malloy (incumbent, General Theological Seminary),Paula D. Nesbitt (University of California, Berkeley, Calif.) andWestern New York Bishop William FranklinGeneral Theological Seminary board of trusteesAnne Clarke Brown (incumbent, Vermont),E. Bruce Garner (Atlanta),The Rev. Yamily Bass-Choate (New York),The Rev. Matthew John Moretz (New York)East Carolina Bishop Clifton Daniel III andMilwaukee Bishop Steven A. Miller.Convention also confirmed appointments by the presiding bishop and outgoing House of Deputies President Bonnie Anderson to the Board for Transition Ministry.Anderson’s appointments were the Rev. Stuart Wright (Maryland), the Rev. Ann Normand (Texas), Paul Cooney (Washington) and Susan Czologosz (Chicago).Jefferts Schori appointed Arizona Bishop Kirk Smith.Finally, convention confirmed appointments to the Board of the Episcopal Archives. Anderson appointed Byron Rushing (Massachusetts), Lawrence Hitt (Colorado), Kay Bishop (California) and the Rev. Robert Sessum (Lexington). Jefferts Schori appointed West Texas Bishop Gary Lillibridge.— The Rev. Mary Frances Schjonberg is an editor/reporter for the Episcopal News Service. Rector Shreveport, LA Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Knoxville, TN Tags Press Release Service Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET General Convention, Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Albany, NY Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Convention elects Episcopalians to churchwide boards General Convention 2012, Youth Minister Lorton, VA Submit a Press Release Featured Jobs & Calls New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Curate Diocese of Nebraska center_img Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH People Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Bath, NC Rector Collierville, TN Rector Pittsburgh, PA AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 By Mary Frances SchjonbergPosted Jul 16, 2012 Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Submit a Job Listing Submit an Event Listing Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Tampa, FL Rector Washington, DC Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Smithfield, NC Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AKlast_img read more

Texas: Kai Ryan named as new canon to the ordinary

first_img Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Collierville, TN [Episcopal Diocese of Texas] Bishop Andy Doyle announced today the appointment of the Rev. Kai Ryan, rector of Ascension, Dallas, as his new Canon to the Ordinary, effective January 1, 2014.  Ryan will replace the Rev. Canon Ann Normand who retires in early 2014.“This is a critical position for me as well as the diocese,” Bishop Doyle said. “Kai will be my primary representative in many different settings across the diocese, and I am confident in her ability to both speak, and listen, to the people of the diocese.”Ryan, a native of Raton, New Mexico, graduated from the University of the South in Sewanee, TN and received her master of divinity from Seminary of the Southwest in 1992 where she currently serves on the Board of Trustees. Ryan served at All Saints, Austin, and in Mobile, AL, before moving to Dallas where she was called as rector of Ascension, Dallas in 1999.  She is married to Timothy Ryan, an attorney, and they have two children, Ned, 18, is a freshman at Goucher College in Baltimore and Eleanor, 12.Ryan’s breadth of experience in four dioceses, Provincial Synod and General Convention, her participation in the national Gathering of Leaders for young clergy and nearly 15 years in a culturally diverse parish as rector stand her in good stead for the work ahead.“The Diocese of Texas exudes creativity and energy, and an optimism about the Episcopal Church’s role in God’s unfolding future,” she said, adding that she was looking forward to working in an environment that “claims areas of difference as opportunities for holy conversation, that believes our deepest call is to serve Christ in the realities of our current context, and that believes in high standards and in God’s grace and forgiveness.”Ryan highlighted the Diocese’s commitment to “raise up, recruit and nurture spiritually rounded and effective clergy” helped her decide to accept the appointment as canon.Bishop Doyle served as Canon to the Ordinary from 2003 to 2008 and appointed Normand upon his election as bishop. Each canon has brought unique gifts to the office he noted.The Rev. John Logan, who served 1996-2000, brought integrity and accountability, Bishop Doyle said, adding that Bishop Harrison, who served as canon prior to her election as bishop suffragan, worked to develop a process of clergy transitions for congregations, safeguarding support for church membership and strong policy development. Normand has built a tremendous network with the wider Church, attracting younger, dynamic clergy from outside the diocese as well as providing essential help in engaging other dioceses’ participation in the IONA School’s training for bi-vocational priests and deacons. She has continued to build integrity in the office while serving as Canon to the Ordinary.Ryan enters the position with a history of cross-cultural ministry with which she hopes to use to enhance the diversity within the clergy of the Diocese of Texas. “I believe the Church’s breadth and depth requires a diverse body of clergy leaders [who will come from] a diversity of seminaries, backgrounds, cultures, generations and theological positions in order to build up the congregations and the Diocese for God’s mission,” she said.“Kai is a leader in the larger Church, the Diocese of Dallas and the Seminary,” Bishop Doyle said. “I believe that she has the qualities needed to raise up, guide and recruit missionary leaders for the next season of our ministry in the Diocese of Texas and I know she will continue the legacy of strong service that has historically resided in the office of canon,” he added. Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Featured Events Rector Shreveport, LA The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Submit an Event Listing Rector Albany, NY Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Bath, NC Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Press Release Service Featured Jobs & Calls The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Posted Oct 9, 2013 Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Hopkinsville, KY An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Belleville, IL An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Submit a Job Listing People Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Pittsburgh, PA center_img Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Martinsville, VA Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Smithfield, NC Submit a Press Release Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Tampa, FL Rector Knoxville, TN Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Washington, DC Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Texas: Kai Ryan named as new canon to the ordinary Director of Music Morristown, NJ Tags Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SClast_img read more

State of Racism conference ends on hopeful note

first_imgState of Racism conference ends on hopeful note Unpacking racism is painful, scary, life-giving work, Mississippi bishop says Rector Shreveport, LA Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Tampa, FL Four participants talk about what they have learned during the Nov. 15-16 “Fifty Years Later: The State of Racism in America” gathering at the Diocese of Mississippi’s St. Andrew’s Episcopal Cathedral in downtown Jackson. Photo: Mary Frances Schjonberg/Episcopal News Service[Episcopal News Service – Jackson, Mississippi] Judging by the report-back from three rounds of small-group discussion, participants in the Nov. 15-16 “Fifty Years Later: The State of Racism in America,” left here with hope and renewed dedication.Navita Cummings James, chair of the Executive Council Committee on Anti-Racism, and the Rev. Angel Ifill, the church’s missioner of Black Ministries, moderated the gathering’s final discussions during which participants were asked to consider the top three things they had learned or had had reinforced during the gathering, how they would personally promote racial healing and understanding, and then how they would work to combat institutional racism.One group’s spokesperson said its members agreed that “the universality of pain” had been reinforced by the conversations of the past two days.“We need to have patience with those who would not come to a forum like this,” said one participant, reporting on what her small group had learned.In terms of promoting racial understanding and healing, another participant said his group agreed that it would be important “to trace out your own narrative or your own trajectory of racial experiences [because] it’s going to help you reach other people if you are clear on your own story.”More than one participant suggested that the conversations begun during the gathering needed to be continued, in the words of one, “whether that’s in our individual churches, the chamber of commerce or other groups that we may be a part of.”One of the younger participants noted that because of the gathering “even for someone in our group who has been in the movement for a long time, there is fresh hope.”In his closing remarks, Diocese of Mississippi Bishop Duncan Gray III noted that “more than a few folks have wondered – some of them out loud in my presence – about the appropriateness of a conversation on racism being hosted by the Episcopal Church in Mississippi.”Saying he understood those questions, Gray recalled what Martin Luther King Jr. said during his famous “I Have a Dream” speech 50 years ago: “I have a dream that one day even the state of Mississippi, a state sweltering with the heat of injustice, sweltering with the heat of oppression, will be transformed into an oasis of freedom and justice.”Gray said he “would be first to admit the wolf has not laid down with the lamb” in his state.The Rt. Rev. Duncan Gray Jr., the seventh bishop of Mississippi, son of the fifth bishop of Mississippi and father of current diocesan Bishop Duncan Gary III, listens to a presentation Nov. 16 on the second day of the “Fifty Years Later: The State of Racism in America” gathering at the Diocese of Mississippi’s St. Andrew’s Episcopal Cathedral in downtown Jackson. Photo: Mary Frances Schjonberg/Episcopal News Service“Nor have we been transformed in an oasis of freedom and justice 50 years later and yet, yet, I am hopeful precisely because I am a child and a native son of this conflicted, heroic, tragic and often violent state,” he said.“I am hopeful that an honest look at our past and a willingness to listen to stories of individuals and communities that we had never known or wanted to know will move us in important ways toward healing, maybe even reconciliation.”The bishop said he was hopeful because “as I unpack the layers of racism deeply embedded in my own soul – often taking the form of very personal, sometimes unconscious racial profiling within my own soul – I have thousands of fellows travelers across this state, some of whom are here, who are doing that same very painful, very scary, very life-giving work.”Gray challenged the rest of the church and the country “if even Mississippi, a state sweltering with injustice and oppression 50 years ago can do this, why can’t others?”The Nov. 16 plenary sessions, workshops and discussions formed the second of two days of work examining the state of racism in the U.S., how far the country and its people have come, and considering the work yet to be done.The Rev. Jim Kodera, a native of Japan and the first Asian-American ordained a priest in the Diocese of Massachusetts, tells a historical narrative of the plight of Asians in America and of Asian Americans during a Nov. 16 workshop that was part of the “Fifty Years Later: The State of Racism in America” gathering at the Diocese of Mississippi’s St. Andrew’s Episcopal Cathedral in downtown Jackson. Photo: Mary Frances Schjonberg/Episcopal News ServiceDuring one of six concurrent workshops that morning, the Rev. James T. Kodera, Wellesley College professor of religion and rector of St. Luke’s Episcopal Church in Hudson, Massachusetts, presented a “historical narrative of the plight of Asians in America and of Asian Americans.” During a subsequent discussion with those who attended the workshop, he suggested “there have to be multiple histories. We have to reject any notion of established history, official history because every history is selective and purposive.”“You have to together write new histories,” said Kodera, a native of Japan who was the first Asian-American to be ordained in the Diocese of Massachusetts. “I think it is our obligation to have the courage to write alternative history so that we can embrace multiple histories” in order to see a more complete picture of the country.The State of Racism gathering was sponsored by the Episcopal Church and the Diocese of Mississippi and held at St. Andrew’s Episcopal Cathedral in downtown Jackson, Mississippi.ENS coverage of the gathering’s opening session on Nov. 15 is here. An ENS series of video reflections from the conference are here.The Nov. 15 webcast, which included a keynote address by Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori and two panel discussions, is available for on-demand viewing here. A discussion guide developed for the forum is available.A related bibliography and other resources are available here.– The Rev. Mary Frances Schjonberg is an editor/reporter for the Episcopal News Service. Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Belleville, IL Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Margaret Ayers says: Featured Events November 21, 2013 at 7:57 am While headlines in the newspapers highlight racial divides in the United States, it was helpful to me to come together with other like minded people who are working to continue the change that is ongoing in our cultures. I believe that many people are working in their communities to bring about change and need a conference to spark new vision as well as find out that no one is working alone. There are many who are working without recognition in their communities as mechanisms of change. But this is hard work and we all need to see were our racism lies hidden. The reason we ended in hope is that although we look as though we are stuck in place, there has been change. I now live in Mississippi and am amazed at the changes that have taken place. I have great opportunities to work for racial reconcilliation and awareness but whatever I do will not be noticed outside my community. I also believe there are thousands of people working in their communities without recongnition from anyone outside. Hidden work needs to be brought into the wider awareness or we do look like we are doing nothing of value.In the article above there are links to materials from the conference. Whatever we do, keep the conversation going in all cultures and contexts! Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Martinsville, VA Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Youth Minister Lorton, VA State of Racism Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Pittsburgh, PA Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 November 18, 2013 at 5:02 pm I am sorry, but what is the point of that headline, if it hadn’t ended on a hopeful note what on earth would the headling have been?I applaud the Diocese for putting on the Conference but the headline just seemed absurd to me Rector Collierville, TN center_img Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Featured Jobs & Calls Tags November 22, 2013 at 5:53 pm Thank you, Margaret, for your words of hope and advice. I, too, believe that “hidden work needs to be brought into the wider awareness”. The work to overcome racism is a never-ending process. When events, articles, and daily words continue to show that racism still exists, we must do all we can to counter racism with more personal encounters by all people seeking reconciliation and better understanding. Thank you also for pointing out the links Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Bath, NC Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Hopkinsville, KY Curate Diocese of Nebraska Nancy Mott says: Rector Washington, DC Rector Smithfield, NC Comments are closed. Rector Knoxville, TN Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Julie Watt Faqir says: Norm Morford says: The Rev. Mary S. Janda says: Submit a Job Listing By Mary Frances SchjonbergPosted Nov 18, 2013 Press Release Service In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Submit a Press Release Submit an Event Listing Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Albany, NY November 18, 2013 at 4:49 pm There needs to be a network through which info may flow to those of us not in attendance.Muchas gracias! November 18, 2013 at 8:59 pm I’m seconding both previous comments. Having read Dr. Harold T. Lewis’s wonderful account “Yet With A Steady Beat: The African American Struggle for Recognition in the Episcopal Church,” I’m heart-sickeningly aware of our church’s long history of conferences, studies and resolutions on racism ending with hope but not determination. I believe that deep-down we whites lack both 1) a real gut-level understanding of the complexity of racism in our country and in our Church and 2) true determination to repent and change. We give blithe lip-service to hopes for racial progress but don’t really put high in our priorities. And we totally don’t “get” how much we ourselves (whites) are also the losers in being so largely a White church. As James Baldwin said, “I have to be Black as long as you are White.” Director of Music Morristown, NJ Comments (5) last_img read more