Unnatural affections

first_img Submit an Event Listing Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Collierville, TN This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Lucy Germany says: Rector Bath, NC April 21, 2012 at 8:04 am Thanks Scott and everyone else for the insightful comments and affirmations. To clarify, I did not mean to suggest that the wealthy are the only ones that lack concern for the environment, but are the main reason why it is not more integrated into worship and liturgy. I had not thought about what you said Scott–that they’re willing to stepon less wealthy toes. In the name of avoiding conflict, I think this does happen. Some clergy have told me that after the dealing with the conflicts over gay ordination and marriage, they just don’t want to have more. As I mention in the commentary, I have found ways to engage people on nature and spirituality that build bridges rather than stir conflict, but one must be spiritually formed on the issue. Happy Earth Day! Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME April 20, 2012 at 1:44 pm This is such an important discussion on so many levels.The disregard we show for the earth is disregard for our children.We are missing a precious opportunity to engage with the best in our God-given creativity to find ways to work in harmony with the sanctity of the earth.A whole generation of bright, creative, think-outside-the-box, young people could find a deeply meaningful place of leadership here if we would only invite and encourage them.Thank you for your clear voice. Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Washington, DC Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Unnatural affections Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Pittsburgh, PA Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET By Phyllis StruppPosted Apr 19, 2012 Rector Shreveport, LA Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Hopkinsville, KY TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Dr. Lo Sprague says: Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Youth Minister Lorton, VA New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books center_img Comments are closed. Rector Tampa, FL Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Knoxville, TN Curate Diocese of Nebraska In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Associate Rector Columbus, GA The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Director of Music Morristown, NJ Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Submit a Job Listing Featured Events Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Featured Jobs & Calls Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH [Episcopal News Service] Six years ago, our district’s state representative granted my request for a meeting. Waiting in his office, I noticed that the walls were covered with pictures of smiling people receiving awards, celebrating birthdays, and holding babies. As he settled in behind his desk with a cup of coffee, he asked what was on my mind. On behalf of the Diocese of Arizona’s Nature and Spirituality Program, I urged him to give careful consideration to ecological consequences when deciding how to vote on several pending bills. Leaning forward, he looked intently at me and said, “I hate environmentalists. I hate them because they like trees more than people.”There is a shred of truth to his harsh words. I have met some environmentalists who have an unnatural affection for nature, embracing it as an escape from destructive human relationships. But far more common is my representative’s unnatural affection for people above everything else.This human-centric perspective is especially common in the Episcopal Church, underlying the anemic response to the bishops’ pastoral teaching on the environment issued in September 2011. This theologically profound work indicates the time has come for reconciling the broken relationship between the church and creation.Based on my experience with green ministry, four widespread attitudes in the church are hindering the Holy Spirit’s work in this area. First and foremost is the view that people come first and nature comes second—as if they are separate entities. Human needs for air, food, water, clothing, shelter, and other necessities are met by resources drawn from the natural world. Even manmade products depend on natural resources. Creation can live without people, but people can’t live without creation. If you don’t care about creation, you don’t really care about people.Secondly, is the attitude that environmentalism is a political issue that should not come up in the church. This concern has kept many clergy from preaching about creation, less they step on the political toes of well-heeled parishioners during tough economic times. Creation as a spiritual issue can be addressed in ways that build bridges between liberals and conservatives. We were able to do this among the members of the Nature and Spirituality Program. However, this bridge building requires spiritual formation on creation that the church is not currently providing to clergy and lay leaders.Thirdly, is the belief that money matters more than natural resources or just about anything else. Perhaps this is an unconscious defense to avoid the unpleasant truth that many Episcopalians’ wallets and the Episcopal Church’s coffers are filled with dirty money that was earned by exploiting the creation.Fourthly, is the view that creation has nothing to do with the gospel and Christ. Perhaps this attitude persists because there is so little preaching and liturgy that includes Creation. However, the Bible confirms that God has a glorious plan for all of creation, not just people. The first two chapters of Genesis reveal that a human being is defined by his or her relationships with God, creation, others and self. The New Testament builds on this spiritual foundation. Jesus refers to his second coming as “the renewal of all things” (Matthew 19:28) and commands, “Go into all the world and preach the gospel to all creation” (Mark 16:15).We are joined at the hip with creation, physically and spiritually.Earth Day, April 22, provides a convenient opportunity to get behind the Holy Spirit’s green work in the church. Is there someone you know who has a passion for environmental advocacy or animal welfare? Take the time to learn more about their work, and how they came to be concerned about the issue. Affirm their willingness to be a voice crying out in the wilderness of an indifferent church and a hostile society. Ask your clergy to preach and teach more about how God is at work in our relationship with creation. Ask the prayer group to pray for the healing of creation and all people and species who have been harmed by ecological distress. Resolve to be just as careful with natural resources as you are with money. Give thanks to God for this good earth—and delight in a natural affection for all that God has made in nature and humanity.— Phyllis Strupp is the author of the award-winning book “The Richest of Fare: Seeking Spiritual Security in the Sonoran Desert” and Church Publishing’s companion curriculum “Faith and Nature: The Divine Adventure of Life on Earth.” Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR April 20, 2012 at 5:38 pm The core of the problem is the way we treat it as an elephant or some other large unwieldy creature on our property…it is soo identified with money, with power, with politics. with complex structures and organization that we forget where it all begins — where you live, where you walk, where you breathe. The interest in nature precedes the love of nature — when you acquire some understanding of it, you can hardly help but love the nature around you and to appreciate its importance as a setting for human activity. True — there are mishaps — storms and drought, but often the passing of these can not only increase your admiration for human flexibility and recovery of human structure but also admiration for the tenacity of nature and for the confidence in its mix of gift and grief — one of which makes us happy and the other which makes us stronger. Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Albany, NY Comments (3) Phyllis Strupp says: Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Press Release Service Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Submit a Press Release Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Belleville, ILlast_img read more

Convention elects Episcopalians to churchwide boards

first_img Rector Belleville, IL TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Featured Events [Episcopal News Service] When the 77th General Convention met July 5-12 in Indianapolis, the bishops and deputies elected people to a number of churchwide boards, and confirmed appointments to others.The convention elected two bishops, seven lay and two clergy members to the church’s Executive Council, which carries out the programs and policies adopted by the General Convention, according to Canon I.4 (1)(a). The council is composed of 38 members, 20 of whom (four bishops, four priests or deacons and 12 lay people) are elected by General Convention and 18 (one clergy and one lay) by provincial synods for six-year terms, plus the presiding bishop and the president of the House of Deputies.Information about the newly elected members of council is here.As happens at every General Convention, the gathering elected the members of the Joint Standing Committee for the Election of the Presiding Bishop. The 27 people elected will be joined by two persons, aged 16-21, who will be appointed by the Rev. Gay Jennings, president of the House of Deputies, according to the election process outlined in Canon I.2.1.The 2013-2015 iteration of the committee will be in charge of nominating at least three bishops to succeed Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori, 58, whose nine-year term ends Oct. 31, 2015. The 27th presiding bishop will be elected at the 78th General Convention to be held in July 2015 in Salt Lake City.In the past, the nominees have been announced prior to the start of the convention during which the election will take place. The names are formally placed into nomination at convention during a joint session of the House of Bishops and the House of Deputies. Nominations from the floor are allowed during that session. There is no limit to the number of terms a presiding bishop may serve. The only requirement is that the presiding bishop must tender his or her resignation to the General Convention that occurs closest to his or her 72nd birthday. All Episcopal Church clergy are required to resign their position when they reach that age.On the day following the joint session, the bishops traditionally meet apart from the convention to elect the next presiding bishop. The bishops then report to the House of Deputies the results of the election, including with the votes cast for each nominee on each ballot. The deputies must then vote to confirm or not confirm the bishops’ choice.The people elected by convention (a bishop, cleric and lay person from each province) to serve on the election committee are:Massachusetts Bishop Thomas Shaw, the Rev. Canon Mally Ewing Lloyd and Dante A. Tavolaro (Province I),Western New York Bishop R. William Franklin, the Rev. Canon Sandye A. Wilson and Diane B. Pollard (Province II),Central Pennsylvania Bishop Nathan Baxter, the Rev. Ruth Lawson Kirk and Nina Vest Salmon (Province III),Mississippi Bishop Duncan Gray, the Rev. Canon Amy Real Coultas and Josephine H. Hicks (Province IV),Michigan Bishop Wendell Gibbs, the Very Rev. Ellis Clifton and William Fleener, Jr. (Province V),Wyoming Bishop John S. Smylie, the Rev. Devon Anderson and Sally A. Johnson (Province VI),Oklahoma Bishop Edward Konieczny, the Rev. Lowell Grisham and Diane P. Butler (Province VII),Los Angeles Bishop Suffragan Mary Glasspool, the Rev. David Hilton Jackson and Pauline (Polly) Getz (Province VIII) andHonduras Bishop Lloyd Allen, the Rev. Jose Francisco Salazar and Luis Eduardo Moreno (Province IX).Other elections during General Convention included:Church Pension Fund board of trusteesRosalie Simmonds Ballentine (Virgin Islands),Barbara B. Creed (incumbent, California),Vincent C. Currie, Jr. (incumbent, Central Gulf Coast),Gordon Fowler (Pennsylvania),Delbert C. Glover (Western Massachusetts),The Rt. Rev. Diane M. Jardine Bruce (Los Angeles),Mr. Ryan K. Kusumoto (Hawaii),Canon Kathryn Weathersby McCormick (Mississippi),Diane B. Pollard (incumbent, New York),The Very Rev. George L. W. Werner (incumbent, Pittsburgh),Sleiman (Solomon) Owayda (Massachsetts) andCecil Wray (incumbent, New York)Disciplinary Board for Bishops(called for in Canon 17 of the church’s rules for disciplining clergy and bishops known as Title IV)The Rev. Canon Angela F. Shepherd (Maryland),The Rev. Peggy E. Tuttle (Hawaii),A. Joseph Alarid (Rio Grande),William J. Fleener, Jr. (Western Michigan),Connecticut Bishop Ian T. Douglas,Texas Bishop Suffragan Dena Harrison,Southern Virginia Bishop Herman Hollerith,Northwest Texas Bishop J. Scott Mayer andRochester Bishop Prince Singh.General Board of Examining ChaplainsFrederick W. Gerbracht, Jr. (Long Island),Sandra D. Michael (incumbent, Central New York),Janet Powers Roth (Oregon),the Rev. Stephen C. Holmgren (incumbent, Western Michigan),the Rev. Danielle Tumminio (Connecticut),the Rev. Peter Vanderveen (Pennsylvania),Frank G. Kirkpatrick (Trinity College, Hartford, Conn.),The Rev. Dr. Patrick Malloy (incumbent, General Theological Seminary),Paula D. Nesbitt (University of California, Berkeley, Calif.) andWestern New York Bishop William FranklinGeneral Theological Seminary board of trusteesAnne Clarke Brown (incumbent, Vermont),E. Bruce Garner (Atlanta),The Rev. Yamily Bass-Choate (New York),The Rev. Matthew John Moretz (New York)East Carolina Bishop Clifton Daniel III andMilwaukee Bishop Steven A. Miller.Convention also confirmed appointments by the presiding bishop and outgoing House of Deputies President Bonnie Anderson to the Board for Transition Ministry.Anderson’s appointments were the Rev. Stuart Wright (Maryland), the Rev. Ann Normand (Texas), Paul Cooney (Washington) and Susan Czologosz (Chicago).Jefferts Schori appointed Arizona Bishop Kirk Smith.Finally, convention confirmed appointments to the Board of the Episcopal Archives. Anderson appointed Byron Rushing (Massachusetts), Lawrence Hitt (Colorado), Kay Bishop (California) and the Rev. Robert Sessum (Lexington). Jefferts Schori appointed West Texas Bishop Gary Lillibridge.— The Rev. Mary Frances Schjonberg is an editor/reporter for the Episcopal News Service. Rector Shreveport, LA Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Knoxville, TN Tags Press Release Service Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET General Convention, Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Albany, NY Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Convention elects Episcopalians to churchwide boards General Convention 2012, Youth Minister Lorton, VA Submit a Press Release Featured Jobs & Calls New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Curate Diocese of Nebraska center_img Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH People Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Bath, NC Rector Collierville, TN Rector Pittsburgh, PA AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 By Mary Frances SchjonbergPosted Jul 16, 2012 Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Submit a Job Listing Submit an Event Listing Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Tampa, FL Rector Washington, DC Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Smithfield, NC Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AKlast_img read more

Texas: Kai Ryan named as new canon to the ordinary

first_img Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Collierville, TN [Episcopal Diocese of Texas] Bishop Andy Doyle announced today the appointment of the Rev. Kai Ryan, rector of Ascension, Dallas, as his new Canon to the Ordinary, effective January 1, 2014.  Ryan will replace the Rev. Canon Ann Normand who retires in early 2014.“This is a critical position for me as well as the diocese,” Bishop Doyle said. “Kai will be my primary representative in many different settings across the diocese, and I am confident in her ability to both speak, and listen, to the people of the diocese.”Ryan, a native of Raton, New Mexico, graduated from the University of the South in Sewanee, TN and received her master of divinity from Seminary of the Southwest in 1992 where she currently serves on the Board of Trustees. Ryan served at All Saints, Austin, and in Mobile, AL, before moving to Dallas where she was called as rector of Ascension, Dallas in 1999.  She is married to Timothy Ryan, an attorney, and they have two children, Ned, 18, is a freshman at Goucher College in Baltimore and Eleanor, 12.Ryan’s breadth of experience in four dioceses, Provincial Synod and General Convention, her participation in the national Gathering of Leaders for young clergy and nearly 15 years in a culturally diverse parish as rector stand her in good stead for the work ahead.“The Diocese of Texas exudes creativity and energy, and an optimism about the Episcopal Church’s role in God’s unfolding future,” she said, adding that she was looking forward to working in an environment that “claims areas of difference as opportunities for holy conversation, that believes our deepest call is to serve Christ in the realities of our current context, and that believes in high standards and in God’s grace and forgiveness.”Ryan highlighted the Diocese’s commitment to “raise up, recruit and nurture spiritually rounded and effective clergy” helped her decide to accept the appointment as canon.Bishop Doyle served as Canon to the Ordinary from 2003 to 2008 and appointed Normand upon his election as bishop. Each canon has brought unique gifts to the office he noted.The Rev. John Logan, who served 1996-2000, brought integrity and accountability, Bishop Doyle said, adding that Bishop Harrison, who served as canon prior to her election as bishop suffragan, worked to develop a process of clergy transitions for congregations, safeguarding support for church membership and strong policy development. Normand has built a tremendous network with the wider Church, attracting younger, dynamic clergy from outside the diocese as well as providing essential help in engaging other dioceses’ participation in the IONA School’s training for bi-vocational priests and deacons. She has continued to build integrity in the office while serving as Canon to the Ordinary.Ryan enters the position with a history of cross-cultural ministry with which she hopes to use to enhance the diversity within the clergy of the Diocese of Texas. “I believe the Church’s breadth and depth requires a diverse body of clergy leaders [who will come from] a diversity of seminaries, backgrounds, cultures, generations and theological positions in order to build up the congregations and the Diocese for God’s mission,” she said.“Kai is a leader in the larger Church, the Diocese of Dallas and the Seminary,” Bishop Doyle said. “I believe that she has the qualities needed to raise up, guide and recruit missionary leaders for the next season of our ministry in the Diocese of Texas and I know she will continue the legacy of strong service that has historically resided in the office of canon,” he added. Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Featured Events Rector Shreveport, LA The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Submit an Event Listing Rector Albany, NY Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Bath, NC Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Press Release Service Featured Jobs & Calls The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Posted Oct 9, 2013 Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Hopkinsville, KY An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Belleville, IL An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Submit a Job Listing People Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Pittsburgh, PA center_img Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Martinsville, VA Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Smithfield, NC Submit a Press Release Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Tampa, FL Rector Knoxville, TN Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Washington, DC Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Texas: Kai Ryan named as new canon to the ordinary Director of Music Morristown, NJ Tags Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SClast_img read more

State of Racism conference ends on hopeful note

first_imgState of Racism conference ends on hopeful note Unpacking racism is painful, scary, life-giving work, Mississippi bishop says Rector Shreveport, LA Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Tampa, FL Four participants talk about what they have learned during the Nov. 15-16 “Fifty Years Later: The State of Racism in America” gathering at the Diocese of Mississippi’s St. Andrew’s Episcopal Cathedral in downtown Jackson. Photo: Mary Frances Schjonberg/Episcopal News Service[Episcopal News Service – Jackson, Mississippi] Judging by the report-back from three rounds of small-group discussion, participants in the Nov. 15-16 “Fifty Years Later: The State of Racism in America,” left here with hope and renewed dedication.Navita Cummings James, chair of the Executive Council Committee on Anti-Racism, and the Rev. Angel Ifill, the church’s missioner of Black Ministries, moderated the gathering’s final discussions during which participants were asked to consider the top three things they had learned or had had reinforced during the gathering, how they would personally promote racial healing and understanding, and then how they would work to combat institutional racism.One group’s spokesperson said its members agreed that “the universality of pain” had been reinforced by the conversations of the past two days.“We need to have patience with those who would not come to a forum like this,” said one participant, reporting on what her small group had learned.In terms of promoting racial understanding and healing, another participant said his group agreed that it would be important “to trace out your own narrative or your own trajectory of racial experiences [because] it’s going to help you reach other people if you are clear on your own story.”More than one participant suggested that the conversations begun during the gathering needed to be continued, in the words of one, “whether that’s in our individual churches, the chamber of commerce or other groups that we may be a part of.”One of the younger participants noted that because of the gathering “even for someone in our group who has been in the movement for a long time, there is fresh hope.”In his closing remarks, Diocese of Mississippi Bishop Duncan Gray III noted that “more than a few folks have wondered – some of them out loud in my presence – about the appropriateness of a conversation on racism being hosted by the Episcopal Church in Mississippi.”Saying he understood those questions, Gray recalled what Martin Luther King Jr. said during his famous “I Have a Dream” speech 50 years ago: “I have a dream that one day even the state of Mississippi, a state sweltering with the heat of injustice, sweltering with the heat of oppression, will be transformed into an oasis of freedom and justice.”Gray said he “would be first to admit the wolf has not laid down with the lamb” in his state.The Rt. Rev. Duncan Gray Jr., the seventh bishop of Mississippi, son of the fifth bishop of Mississippi and father of current diocesan Bishop Duncan Gary III, listens to a presentation Nov. 16 on the second day of the “Fifty Years Later: The State of Racism in America” gathering at the Diocese of Mississippi’s St. Andrew’s Episcopal Cathedral in downtown Jackson. Photo: Mary Frances Schjonberg/Episcopal News Service“Nor have we been transformed in an oasis of freedom and justice 50 years later and yet, yet, I am hopeful precisely because I am a child and a native son of this conflicted, heroic, tragic and often violent state,” he said.“I am hopeful that an honest look at our past and a willingness to listen to stories of individuals and communities that we had never known or wanted to know will move us in important ways toward healing, maybe even reconciliation.”The bishop said he was hopeful because “as I unpack the layers of racism deeply embedded in my own soul – often taking the form of very personal, sometimes unconscious racial profiling within my own soul – I have thousands of fellows travelers across this state, some of whom are here, who are doing that same very painful, very scary, very life-giving work.”Gray challenged the rest of the church and the country “if even Mississippi, a state sweltering with injustice and oppression 50 years ago can do this, why can’t others?”The Nov. 16 plenary sessions, workshops and discussions formed the second of two days of work examining the state of racism in the U.S., how far the country and its people have come, and considering the work yet to be done.The Rev. Jim Kodera, a native of Japan and the first Asian-American ordained a priest in the Diocese of Massachusetts, tells a historical narrative of the plight of Asians in America and of Asian Americans during a Nov. 16 workshop that was part of the “Fifty Years Later: The State of Racism in America” gathering at the Diocese of Mississippi’s St. Andrew’s Episcopal Cathedral in downtown Jackson. Photo: Mary Frances Schjonberg/Episcopal News ServiceDuring one of six concurrent workshops that morning, the Rev. James T. Kodera, Wellesley College professor of religion and rector of St. Luke’s Episcopal Church in Hudson, Massachusetts, presented a “historical narrative of the plight of Asians in America and of Asian Americans.” During a subsequent discussion with those who attended the workshop, he suggested “there have to be multiple histories. We have to reject any notion of established history, official history because every history is selective and purposive.”“You have to together write new histories,” said Kodera, a native of Japan who was the first Asian-American to be ordained in the Diocese of Massachusetts. “I think it is our obligation to have the courage to write alternative history so that we can embrace multiple histories” in order to see a more complete picture of the country.The State of Racism gathering was sponsored by the Episcopal Church and the Diocese of Mississippi and held at St. Andrew’s Episcopal Cathedral in downtown Jackson, Mississippi.ENS coverage of the gathering’s opening session on Nov. 15 is here. An ENS series of video reflections from the conference are here.The Nov. 15 webcast, which included a keynote address by Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori and two panel discussions, is available for on-demand viewing here. A discussion guide developed for the forum is available.A related bibliography and other resources are available here.– The Rev. Mary Frances Schjonberg is an editor/reporter for the Episcopal News Service. Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Belleville, IL Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Margaret Ayers says: Featured Events November 21, 2013 at 7:57 am While headlines in the newspapers highlight racial divides in the United States, it was helpful to me to come together with other like minded people who are working to continue the change that is ongoing in our cultures. I believe that many people are working in their communities to bring about change and need a conference to spark new vision as well as find out that no one is working alone. There are many who are working without recognition in their communities as mechanisms of change. But this is hard work and we all need to see were our racism lies hidden. The reason we ended in hope is that although we look as though we are stuck in place, there has been change. I now live in Mississippi and am amazed at the changes that have taken place. I have great opportunities to work for racial reconcilliation and awareness but whatever I do will not be noticed outside my community. I also believe there are thousands of people working in their communities without recongnition from anyone outside. Hidden work needs to be brought into the wider awareness or we do look like we are doing nothing of value.In the article above there are links to materials from the conference. Whatever we do, keep the conversation going in all cultures and contexts! Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Martinsville, VA Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Youth Minister Lorton, VA State of Racism Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Pittsburgh, PA Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 November 18, 2013 at 5:02 pm I am sorry, but what is the point of that headline, if it hadn’t ended on a hopeful note what on earth would the headling have been?I applaud the Diocese for putting on the Conference but the headline just seemed absurd to me Rector Collierville, TN center_img Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Featured Jobs & Calls Tags November 22, 2013 at 5:53 pm Thank you, Margaret, for your words of hope and advice. I, too, believe that “hidden work needs to be brought into the wider awareness”. The work to overcome racism is a never-ending process. When events, articles, and daily words continue to show that racism still exists, we must do all we can to counter racism with more personal encounters by all people seeking reconciliation and better understanding. Thank you also for pointing out the links Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Bath, NC Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Hopkinsville, KY Curate Diocese of Nebraska Nancy Mott says: Rector Washington, DC Rector Smithfield, NC Comments are closed. Rector Knoxville, TN Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Julie Watt Faqir says: Norm Morford says: The Rev. Mary S. Janda says: Submit a Job Listing By Mary Frances SchjonbergPosted Nov 18, 2013 Press Release Service In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Submit a Press Release Submit an Event Listing Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Albany, NY November 18, 2013 at 4:49 pm There needs to be a network through which info may flow to those of us not in attendance.Muchas gracias! November 18, 2013 at 8:59 pm I’m seconding both previous comments. Having read Dr. Harold T. Lewis’s wonderful account “Yet With A Steady Beat: The African American Struggle for Recognition in the Episcopal Church,” I’m heart-sickeningly aware of our church’s long history of conferences, studies and resolutions on racism ending with hope but not determination. I believe that deep-down we whites lack both 1) a real gut-level understanding of the complexity of racism in our country and in our Church and 2) true determination to repent and change. We give blithe lip-service to hopes for racial progress but don’t really put high in our priorities. And we totally don’t “get” how much we ourselves (whites) are also the losers in being so largely a White church. As James Baldwin said, “I have to be Black as long as you are White.” Director of Music Morristown, NJ Comments (5) last_img read more

First woman priest honored

first_img A portrait of Li on display at Toronto’s St. James Cathedral commemorates a “true saint of the church.” Photo: Diana Swift[Anglican Journal] On Jan. 25,1944, as much of China lay in the iron grip of the Japanese invasion, the church marked a groundbreaking event. A fearless Anglican bishop, discerning a match between wartime need and a uniquely gifted person, ordained a humble yet steel-spined disciple of Christ into the priesthood. The bishop was Ronald Hall of Victoria and the ordinand was Hong-Kong-born Li Tim-Oi, the church’s first woman priest.Later, graciously relinquishing her licence in the face of Canterbury-led reaction from the establishment, Li continued her ministry during the Japanese occupation and the Communist regime that followed.On January 25, 2014, the 70th anniversary of the Rev. Dr. Florence Li Tim-Oi’s ordination was the leitmotif of a choral eucharist celebrating the ordination of women at Toronto’s Cathedral Church of St. James. Organized with the University of Waterloo’s Renison University College, which holds Li’s archives, and presided over by Bishop Linda Nicholls of the diocese of Toronto, the service honoured Li’s unwavering ministry during the war and the Cultural Revolution.From Lambeth Palace, Archbishop of Canterbury Justin Welby sent greetings, noting that Li Tim-Oi “had been given the gift of priesthood” and that though she resigned her licence in the face of controversy, she never resigned her priestly orders but served God all her life.” Tim-Oi means “much beloved,” and Welby said she “was a gift to the worldwide Anglican Church and will continue to be much beloved for all that she did.”Archbishop of Toronto and Metropolitan of Ontario Colin Johnson welcomed attendees and praised Bishop Hall for his visionary decision. Archbishop Fred Hiltz, primate of the Anglican Church of Canada, called the pioneering priest “a woman who is remembered for the Christ-like nature of her character.” He added that “she lived her vocation as a priest with such a faithfulness and quiet dignity that it convinced many across the Anglican Communion that the Holy Spirit works as wondrously among women as among men.”Renison’s Chancellor Ralph Spence called her “one of the true saints of the church…a determined Christian who set an example.”Reading a wartime excerpt from Li’s autobiography, Raindrops of my Life, Li Tim-Oi’s niece, Sze Sze Lee, revealed how her aunt felt compelled to preach the gospel of Christ no matter the circumstances.With a choir gathered from several Chinese-Canadian parishes, the Rev. Philip Der of St. Christopher’s, North York and Richmond Hill, Ont., was cantor in a responsive singing of the Lord’s Prayer in Cantonese.From the pulpit, Canon Judy Rois, executive director of the Anglican Foundation of Canada, called the occasion a day to remember “the hard work, resolve and dedication of women in the priesthood” and a day to “thank all those who helped us get here…who held our hand and dried our tears”—those who stood in solidarity with women when it was unpopular to do so.With 38 years of women’s ordination in Canada behind us, the homilist recalled her time in the 1990s as the cathedral’s first woman vicar. Once, when filling in at a Friday mass, she began the liturgy with her back to a congregation of about 10. When she turned to face them for the Collect, not a soul remained to receive the sacrament. Had they left because of her gender, she wondered?But her disappointments two decades into women’s ordination in this country were small compared with the obstacles faced by Li Tim-Oi, Rois said. Noting that there are now more than 700 women clergy in Canada and 35 women bishops in the Anglican Communion, Rois said that the story that began with women in our sacred scriptures, and continued down through the ages, is still being written today by women writing chapters in their lives and that of the church. “It is a better world when we all work and serve together as the body of Christ…a world where there is a place-card for everyone at God’s table.” Heather Huyck says: Rector Martinsville, VA Anglican Communion, People, January 28, 2014 at 8:19 pm I am greatly encouraged by the stories of courage above. As a deacon in the Diocese of Sydney where women are not yet ordained as priests, I take comfort from those who celebrated the life and ministry of Li Tim-Oi. Rector Belleville, IL Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Women’s Ministry Rector Collierville, TN Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET By Diana SwiftPosted Jan 28, 2014 Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Washington, DC February 3, 2014 at 10:46 am I am glad that Archbishop Justin Welby is thankful for the ministry of Li Tim-Oi. Unfortunately, like his predecessor, he speaks of the “Anglican Church.” There are Anglican churches (and pseudo-Anglican churches), but there is no global “Anglican Church.” There is, of course, an Anglican Communion. The Archbishop of Canterbury is not an Anglican pope. Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Shreveport, LA Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT January 31, 2014 at 5:31 am With the witness of this brave yet humble woman, who can doubt the calling God has placed on women to minister, to preach and to lead. Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH January 28, 2014 at 10:16 pm I had the privilege of meeting Rev. Li at Barbara Harris’ consecration in Boston. How proud and uplifting for Women of Color that the first two women ordained priest and consecrated bishop were our sisters! I will be presenting a monologue of her life at St. John’s Parish in Oakland and at the Church Divinity School of the Pacific in Berkeley as we commemorate and celebrate the 70th Anniversary of her ordination. A true pioneer of the church! Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Tags Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI The Rev. Fred Fenton says: Garet Key says: Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Lionel Deimel says: Curate Diocese of Nebraska February 3, 2014 at 4:04 pm I first met the Rev. Dr. Florence Li Tim Oi when she visited my church in Oakland, CA in 1948. I next met her at Canterbury Cathedral in 1986 when MOW (Movement for the Ordination of Women) sponsored a gathering to honor women’s ministries, lay and ordained.The Episcopal Women’s Caucus (EWC) sponsored a gathering of lay and ordained women during the 1988 Lambeth Conference. There is a photo of Li Tim Oi and me in an account of that event written by the Rev. Jean Staffeld Jersey entitled “Her Daughters Shall Rise Up.” The photo’s caption identifies Li Tim Oi as “the first woman ordained priest in the Anglican Communion” and me as “the first Asian-American woman ordained priest in the Episcopal Church.” Submit an Event Listing An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Knoxville, TN Associate Rector Columbus, GA Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK First woman priest honored Comments are closed. Submit a Press Release Press Release Service The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group center_img Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Hopkinsville, KY Jean Mayland says: Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Comments (9) Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA The Rev. Canon Edmund B. Der says: Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 January 31, 2014 at 1:05 pm The President of the Eucharist at St Martin in the Field on 25 January in honour of Li Tim Oi was the grand daughter of Bishop Hall who ordained her 70 years ago..Christopher Hall ,the Bishop’s son, was also present.He carried in the icon of Li Tim Oi and also assisted in giving communion to the congregation. Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Albany, NY An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Carole Jan Lee says: Featured Events The Rev. Dr. Fran Toy says: New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Smithfield, NC The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Submit a Job Listing Rector Bath, NC January 28, 2014 at 4:42 pm Hurray for her courage, and for Galatians 3:28 that gave all of us courage. Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Director of Music Morristown, NJ January 28, 2014 at 8:11 pm Before we ordained the first women priests in this country, George Regas invited Li Tim- Oi to All Saints, Pasadena. As she came down the aisle in the opening procession we sang “The Church’s One Foundation.” When we got to “she is his new creation,” I lost it. What a woman. What a day. What a promise for the future. When Barbara Harris was ordained the first woman Bishop in Boston, I remembered that morning in Pasadena and gave thanks for Li, for Bishop Ronald Hall who ordained her, and for George Regas and all who led the fight for women’s ordination. Rector Tampa, FL Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Susan Emeleus says: Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Pittsburgh, PA February 7, 2014 at 12:24 am I first met Rev. Li Tim Oi in 1941 in Hong Kong right after her ordination as a deacon. She was the homilist in our family thanksgiving service at home. Somehow I as a 5 year old boy put on my sister’s scarf as my stole and stood by her all throughout her sermon and I was later known in All Saints Parish as the little priest of the Der family. Then later from 1984 until 1992 she was my assistant at St. Matthew’s & St. John’s Parish, Toronto. As editor of her book, Raindrops of My Life in English and Chinese and for many years helped organized services commemorating her and her minisitry, I am so grateful to God to be so close to a saint. This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Bishop Diocesan Springfield, ILlast_img read more

Liberian priest emerges from quarantine to spread word about Ebola

first_img Press Release Service Health & Healthcare The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Posted Oct 21, 2014 Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Africa, Submit a Job Listing Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Pittsburgh, PA Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Featured Jobs & Calls Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Rector Collierville, TN Youth Minister Lorton, VA Anglican Communion, Associate Rector Columbus, GA Tags Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Submit a Press Release TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Albany, NY The Rev. Herman Browne voluntarily quarantined himself for 21 days after his wife’s friend tested positive for Ebola. On Oct. 19, he returned to his church, Trinity Cathedral, in Monrovia, Liberia to preach to his congregation about Ebola prevention, National Public Radio reports.Browne began educating his congregation about Ebola long before it affected the family directly. And it’s clear the message has been received at the church. People sanitize their hands before entering the cathedral. A priest delivers the Holy Communion wafers with tweezers. The church program tells the congregation: “Do not hide sick persons.”Read  NPR’s story and listen to the radio report here. Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Smithfield, NC Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Submit an Event Listing Rector Shreveport, LA Featured Events Liberian priest emerges from quarantine to spread word about Ebola Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Curate Diocese of Nebraska Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Washington, DC New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Belleville, IL Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud: Crossing continents and cultures with the most beautiful instrument you’ve never heard Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Tampa, FL Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Bath, NC Rector Martinsville, VA Director of Music Morristown, NJ Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector and Chaplain Eugene, ORlast_img read more

Anglican churches assisting those displaced by crisis in Burundi

first_img Tags This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Press Release Service Rector Tampa, FL Rector Collierville, TN Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Refugees Migration & Resettlement Rector Pittsburgh, PA Submit a Press Release Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Anglican churches assisting those displaced by crisis in Burundi Rector Knoxville, TN By ACNS staff based on information from the Anglican AlliancePosted May 28, 2015 Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Featured Jobs & Calls Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Hopkinsville, KY The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Featured Events Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Shreveport, LA Submit a Job Listing The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Submit an Event Listing In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 [Anglican Communion News Service] The Province of the Anglican Church of Burundi is preparing to assist people displaced by violence and insecurity due to the ongoing political crisis in the country.Unrest began last month with President Nkurunziza’s announcement that he intended to run for a third term of office, a re-election bid which his opponents say violates the constitution. At least 20 civilians have since died in clashes with police during mass demonstrations.The security situation has continued to deteriorate in the wake of the failed military coup on May 13 and the death of Zedi Feruzi, opposition leader of the Union for Peace and Development (UPD) party.Many people have fled their home in fear of the “Imbonerakure” youth militia who are faithful to the president’s party. The opposition coalition has accused the government of targeting its leaders for arrest and detention, forced disappearance, torture and inhumane treatment of demonstrators, UNHCR said. Many opposition leaders have gone into hiding. Nearly all privately operated media have been forced to shut down.Nearly 90,000 Burundians have fled to neighboring countries since April 2015, according to UNHCR, while a significant number have sought refuge with friends or family in other towns or provinces.Internally displacedThose fleeing the insecurity and violence are living in dire conditions and lack food, water, sanitation and health services, clothing and shelter, Leonidas Niyongabo, provincial development officer of the Anglican Church of Burundi, reported to the Anglican Alliance. With the closure of universities and secondary schools, students are particular vulnerable.Many people are stranded at Burundi’s borders, unable to cross into neighboring countries due to administrative obstacles.“Urgent intervention is very much needed,” he said.The church has created emergency committees in 10 of its parishes to assist as the security situation permits. A rapid needs assessment will be carried out to determine how best to respond, particularly to give support to children and women.“Most humanitarian organizations are leaving the country, which adds to the urgency,” Niyongabo said.Anglican churches in neighboring countries also are responding to the crisis, assisting Burundian refugees arriving in their dioceses. Nearly 10,000 Burundians have crossed into the eastern part of the Democratic Republic of Congo and nearly 47,000 have sought refuge in Tanzania, according to UNHCR.The Diocese of Bukavu in the Province of the Anglican Church of Congo (Province de l’Eglise Anglicane Du Congo) is seeking to assist 150 refugee families, in total 600 people, who are living either in church buildings or with host families, the Anglican Alliance reports.The Diocese of Western Tanganyika in the Anglican Church of Tanzania reports a new influx of Burundian refugees. The diocese has been donating food and non-food items to way stations for refugees families on their journey to the Nyarugusu refugee camp.On behalf of the Anglican Church of Burundi, Niyongabo thanked the Anglican Communion for its support for people in crisis and requested further prayer.“We ask you to continue to pray for the country and for all the people of Burundi. May the hand of God continue to work so that God’s righteousness, peace, and unity prevail in Burundi,” he said.*This news story is based on information from the Anglican Alliance which is working closely with the Relief Department of the Anglican Church of Burundi.Information on how to support the response of Anglican churches to people displaced by the crisis in Burundi will be available shortly from the Anglican Alliance. Please visit the Anglican Alliance website for further updates on the situation in Burundi and neighboring countries.Share prayers for Burundi on the Prayer Wall of the Anglican Communion website. Rector Smithfield, NC Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Bath, NC TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud: Crossing continents and cultures with the most beautiful instrument you’ve never heard Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 Africa, Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Belleville, IL New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Curate Diocese of Nebraska Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Martinsville, VA Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Youth Minister Lorton, VA Associate Rector Columbus, GA Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Albany, NY Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Director of Music Morristown, NJ Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Washington, DC Anglican Communion, last_img read more

Video: Presiding Bishop’s sermon commemorating Absalom Jones

first_img Youth Minister Lorton, VA Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Submit a Job Listing Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Presiding Bishop Michael Curry, Press Release Service Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Hopkinsville, KY Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Featured Events Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Collierville, TN Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Bath, NC Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Tampa, FL Posted Feb 8, 2016 Video: Presiding Bishop’s sermon commemorating Absalom Jones Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Associate Rector Columbus, GA In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 [Episcopal News Service] Presiding Bishop Michael Curry returned to the Diocese of Washington Feb. 7 to preach at a 3 p.m. Eucharist commemorating Absalom Jones, the first African-American to be ordained an Episcopal priest. The service included traditional African-American hymns and music of the African diaspora. The service was held at Washington National Cathedral and co-sponsored by Saint Andrew’s, College Park, the Union of Black Episcopalians, and the Diocese of Washington.A video stream of the full service is available below. Curry’s sermon begins at 54:40. Rector Smithfield, NC Featured Jobs & Callscenter_img Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Shreveport, LA Submit a Press Release Tags Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Washington, DC An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Knoxville, TN Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Video This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Pittsburgh, PA Submit an Event Listing Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Belleville, IL Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Albany, NYlast_img read more

California: San Leandro church goes solar

first_img Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Posted Nov 18, 2016 Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Martinsville, VA Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Advocacy Peace & Justice, Rector Tampa, FL Press Release Service Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Submit a Job Listing Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Smithfield, NC In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Belleville, IL Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET California: San Leandro church goes solar Local congregation to install 9.24kw solar power system The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Submit an Event Listingcenter_img Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Submit a Press Release Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Shreveport, LA Environment & Climate Change Rector Collierville, TN Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Youth Minister Lorton, VA [All Saints Episcopal Church press release] This month, as part of a comprehensive greening project, All Saints Episcopal Church in San Leandro, California, will have a 9.24kw solar power system installed on the church. This system will include 33 panels and will generate enough electricity to cover the church’s entire electricity bill. This greening project at the church has also brought heightened awareness around recycling and other energy-efficiency improvements to the congregation.All Saints is a member congregation of the Diocese of California and has embarked on this greening project through the support of the United Thank Offering. The solar panel system will be installed by SunWork Renewable Energy Projects, a nonprofit in California’s San Francisco Bay Area that installs solar electricity systems on small-energy-footprint homes and nonprofit companies with the help of trained volunteers. More information about SunWork can be found online at www.sunwork.org.The Rev. Justin R. Cannon, rector of All Saints, is a strong advocate for environmental causes. He is the founder and director of Holy Hikes, leads a noontime “Celtic Earth Mass” every Wednesday at the church, and believes that “we cannot honor the Creator if we do not care for God’s creation.”All Saints is an inclusive, welcoming, and progressive Episcopal congregation nestled in the heart of the Broadmoor district in San Leandro. As San Leandro’s only Episcopal congregation, in addition to spiritual services and support, the church also supports local homeless services and operates a monthly food pantry, which offers free groceries to those in need. The church holds Sunday Services at 8 a.m. and 10:15 a.m. More information can be found online at www.saintsalive.net. Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Bath, NC New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Washington, DC Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Albany, NY Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Knoxville, TN AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Hopkinsville, KY Associate Rector Columbus, GA Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Curate Diocese of Nebraska Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Tags An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Featured Eventslast_img read more

South Carolina church finds ‘natural connection’ with middle school in…

first_img Rector Shreveport, LA TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab South Carolina church finds ‘natural connection’ with middle school in push for education equity By David PaulsenPosted Jan 23, 2018 Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Martinsville, VA Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Poverty & Hunger, Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Belleville, IL Youth Minister Lorton, VA Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Submit an Event Listing Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Tampa, FL The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Press Release Service Featured Jobs & Calls The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Washington, DC Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Knoxville, TN Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Tags Submit a Job Listing Associate Rector Columbus, GA Director of Music Morristown, NJ Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York center_img An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Smithfield, NC Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Albany, NY Advocacy Peace & Justice, Rector Collierville, TN This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Children, AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Submit a Press Release Curate Diocese of Nebraska Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Racial Justice & Reconciliation Featured Events Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Bath, NC Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Patti Trotter, right, leads the cooking club in a cookie baking activity. Trotter and other volunteers from Trinity Episcopal Cathedral lead after-school activities on Thursdays at W.A. Perry Middle School in Columbia, South Carolina. Photo: David Paulsen/Episcopal News Service[Episcopal News Service – Columbia, South Carolina] The students of W.A. Perry Middle School know it’s 4 p.m. when the speakers begin blaring end-of-day announcements – information about the upcoming Sweetheart Ball, encouragement to “read, read, read your way to new heights.” And on this afternoon, a reminder: “Club Thursday.”“All after-school students should report to the cafeteria and sit in your assigned sections,” the announcement blared.Students who spend their early evenings at W.A. Perry know the routine by now. They know Club Thursdays mean an hour of cooking, sewing, tennis or golf. They know school social worker Marilyn Doucet will be checking to make sure they get to their assigned clubs. And they know the activities will be led not by school personnel but by a small, dedicated band of community volunteers.The volunteers come from Trinity Episcopal Cathedral in downtown Columbia, a detail of only passing importance to the students’ comprehension of the activities, yet underlying these experiences is a 16-year relationship between the cathedral and W.A. Perry. The cathedral’s lasting commitment of support is renewed every Thursday with each cookie baked and each needle threaded.“It’s been a great partnership with Trinity. What they do for us is priceless,” Doucet said Jan. 18 during Episcopal News Service’s visit to the after-school program.Church-school partnerships like this one in South Carolina’s capital city engage Episcopalians in the Episcopal Church’s call to address education inequity. It is a call taken up most prominently by the All Our Children network, which held a conference in Columbia last week that drew more than 100 educators, advocates and church leaders from multiple denominations.All Our Children is an ecumenical network with roots in the Episcopal Church. It was backed in 2015 by a General Convention resolution that identified church-school partnerships as “a path for following Jesus into the neighborhood, addressing educational inequity, and rejuvenating congregations.”South Carolina has been fertile ground for such partnerships thanks to the Bishops’ Public Education Initiative, which involves the state’s Episcopal, Lutheran, Roman Catholic, United Methodist, African Methodist Episcopal, African Methodist Episcopal Zion and Christian Methodist Episcopal churches.Diocese of Upper South Carolina Bishop Andrew Waldo, left, speaks Jan. 17 about an education initiative involving several Christian denominations in the state. Waldo was part of a panel discussion during the All Our Children conference held at Trinity Episcopal Church in Columbia, South Carolina. Photo: David Paulsen/Episcopal News Service“God is calling us to raise up the gifts of every child that was put on this planet,” Diocese of Upper South Carolina Bishop Andrew Waldo said Jan. 17 at the All Our Children conference during a panel discussion about the Bishop’s Initiative.Waldo’s implication was one that reverberated across the three-day conference held at the cathedral: American children, though “created equal” in the eyes of Jeffersonian democracy, are not always treated equitably by their public education system, but instead find the scales tipped according to race, language, family income and even the street where they live.All Our Children seeks to balance those scales, and a common refrain at the conference was the need to develop meaningful relationships across racial, cultural and social divides. Anyone searching for examples could begin with the divide between the mostly white, affluent congregation at Trinity Episcopal Cathedral and the mostly black, low-income student body at W.A. Perry about a 10-minute drive to the north.“It’s good to see y’all here,” volunteer Patti Trotter said as the Club Thursdays cooking class got underway. The 16 students, broken into four groups, sat at tables in a classroom equipped with ovens and furnished with cookware and utensils.Of the 50 or so students in Club Thursdays, each identifies preferred activities at the start of the academic year and is assigned by the school to two of them, one club in the fall and the second club starting in January. This was the first club meeting of the new year, so Trotter and other volunteers from the cathedral helped the cooking students make an easy inaugural treat, cookies from prepackaged cookie dough.Trinity volunteer Beth Yon shows a W.A. Perry student some of the finer points of sewing a hem during one of the four Club Thursday activities at the school. Photo: David Paulsen/Episcopal News ServiceIn the next room, fellow volunteer Beth Yon showed about a half dozen students how to sew a hem. Tie a big knot, she advised, so it will anchor the thread.The students will progress over the coming weeks to sewing a button, operating a sewing machine and eventually working on a final project, such as a pillow or a bag, Doucet said.The volunteers are called to this work by their faith, but religion isn’t discussed with the students. And despite the classroom setting, these lessons are not academic in a traditional sense. Their value is in the interaction between adult and child.“That’s very good,” Yon said to one girl, who was scrutinizing her stitches. “I’ll show you a trick,” Yon continued, and then imparted a nugget of needle-earned wisdom.Bridging divides in the push for education equityFor each Club Thursday activity, the cathedral sends three to six volunteers to help. The activities are chosen to give the students opportunities to try new experiences, and the volunteers also gain new experiences, spending time in a school and a neighborhood removed from their daily lives, said the Rev. Patsy Malanuk, Trinity’s canon for mission and outreach.“We’ve made deep relationships with the people at W.A. Perry,” Malanuk said, adding that the interactions with school officials and students have expanded her own “depth of experience.”School buses wait for students just before the end of classes at W.A. Perry Middle School in Columbia, South Carolina. Photo: David Paulsen/Episcopal News ServiceW.A. Perry, one of nine middle schools in the Richland 1 School District, was chosen by Trinity for outreach partly because the cathedral already had been involved in the neighborhood, through a homeless ministry called St. Lawrence Place.Perry also is known as a Title 1 school, a federal classification indicating its students come predominantly from low-income families. Of its 375 students, 98 percent are from families with incomes low enough to qualify for free or reduced lunches. (Because of low family incomes district-wide, all students in the district now can receive free lunches.)The schools in South Carolina receiving federal Title 1 assistance make up a long list, but education equity advocates say some of the greatest need is found many miles from Columbia in the poor, rural school districts along the state’s Interstate 95 corridor. Crumbling facilities are common, resources are scarce and students are deprived of even a “minimally adequate education,” according to the South Carolina Supreme Court, which ruled in 2014 that the state had failed to meet its obligation to 30 school districts in that region.The court ordered the Legislature to develop a funding plan to correct that injustice, but after turnover on the bench, the State Supreme Court effectively reversed itself in November 2017, concluding it was up to legislators, not judges, to decide proper funding levels for education.Much of the public’s awareness of the rural schools’ plight was generated by the 2005 documentary “Corridor of Shame,” which depicted conditions in six of the districts included in the lawsuit. The film was directed by Bud Ferillo, a South Carolina native and former political aide to some of the state’s top elected officials.Bud Ferillo, interviewed in Columbia, directed the documentary “Corridor of Shame.” Photo: David Paulsen/Episcopal News ServiceDespite the attention his film brought to the issue of education equity, Ferillo thinks progress has been uneven at best. Some districts and schools may have improved, he said, but not through any concerted effort by lawmakers.“The state has not taken any definitive action to address the problems that were brought up in the suit,” Ferillo told Episcopal News Service in an interview near his home in Columbia.The South Carolina churches, on the other hand, have provided a model for pushing progressive stances on the issue, he said. Such broad coalitions of action put pressure on the state to adequately fund public education.Ferillo also doesn’t see equity as a rural versus urban issue. The funding reforms sought by the rural districts’ lawsuit would benefit poor districts in cities like Columbia as well.“Any decent remedy, we’ve always said, would not just be restricted to plaintiff districts,” he said. “It would be to any district similarly situated, with the same kinds of statistics – low-achievement schools with overwhelming minority enrollment and underpaid staff.”Malanuk acknowledged the range of need in South Carolina and in her city. “There’s still some schools around here that may be in deeper need,” she said, but the cathedral remains committed to the students at W.A. Perry.‘Natural connection’ bonds church, school for 16 yearsW.A. Perry Middle School, likewise, is glad to have Trinity as a partner.Marilyn Doucet, left, is the W.A. Perry Middle School social worker, and Robin Coletrain is the school’s principal. Photo: David Paulsen/Episcopal News Service“It’s been just a very great relationship,” Robin Coletrain, W.A. Perry’s principal, said. “They do so much for us, and you just see the compassion and love in everything they do.”Coletrain has worked as a teacher and administrator in the Richland 1 district for 17 years. This is her second year at W.A. Perry.“Our kids come from some difficult home situations,” Coletrain said. Some live in single-parent homes or have parents working two or three jobs to get by. Some students are staying with their families at the temporary housing provided by St. Lawrence Place.Whatever challenges the school faces, it offers a warm and welcoming environment for sixth-, seventh- and eighth-graders. As important as the facility, Coletrain said, are the experiences the school offers the students, from field trips to see “The Nutcracker” to the activities after school.The after-school programs are partly funded by a federal grant, but Club Thursdays wouldn’t be the same without the volunteers from Trinity Episcopal Cathedral. Some of those volunteers spent the afternoon Jan. 18 coaching students on proper tennis technique on the courts outside the school, while others accompanied some students to a golf center a short distance away.Inside the school, the cooking club’s first session was wrapping up.“I’m so glad all of y’all are here,” Trotter said. “You did great on your cookies. You did great on your cleaning. We appreciate it.”Eighth-grader Caliyah Thompson, 13, was all smiles, joking with a classmate about some of the food she has made at home. Pasta, for starters. And a cake.“Two-layer cake,” she said, with a glint of pride.She and the other club members will learn table manners and a bit of floral arranging in the coming weeks before building up to a final entrée, such as lasagna.Doucet has been involved with the school’s partnership with Trinity from the beginning. She has worked at W.A. Perry for 18 years, long enough to see two generations of neighborhood families pass through the school’s doors.Through Club Thursdays, some of those students receive “experiences they wouldn’t get to have,” Doucet said, because of the work of people like Betty Gregory, one of the original volunteers from Trinity.Betty Gregory helps students cut cookie dough onto sheets for their after-school cooking activity at W.A. Perry. Gregory was among the volunteers from Trinity Episcopal Cathedral who 16 years ago helped start this church-school partnership, which Gregory called a “natural connection.” Photo: David Paulsen/Episcopal News ServiceAt 5:10 p.m., with the school’s kitchen tidied up after the cooking club, Gregory and Doucet chatted about how the partnership formed and how far it has come.The cathedral had parishioners who wanted to serve the community, and the school had needs to be met, Gregory said, but she and other volunteers didn’t go to the school with their own proposals. They started by asking school officials what they needed and then listening.Administrators said they needed more books, so the cathedral donated books. Then the volunteers asked what else was needed. More service projects followed.Eventually, school officials explained that they were running out of ideas for after-school enrichment activities. Trinity’s volunteers had some suggestions based on their individual interests.“Within six weeks, we had a program up and going,” Gregory said, calling it a ministry of presence.Now 16 years later, she sees the relationship between the cathedral and the school as something “intangible,” even “magical.”“It’s sort of like this natural connection,” Gregory said. “There was just something about Perry and Trinity coming together that was God-inspired.”– David Paulsen is an editor and reporter for the Episcopal News Service. He can be reached at [email protected]last_img read more